Tag Archives: adult fiction

Four Books About Convention Life That You Should Check Out

mitsuadaI love conventions, and they were a huge part of my life for many years. Video games, anime, cosplay, fanart, deal’s room, big scale guests, these were my favourite things to immerse myself in during the summer months. I adored cosplaying, even if my costumers were a bit more DIY than those with real sewing talents. Often we’d go in large groups, protraying characters from one favourite series. Some of the best memories and friendships I’ve made, are because of fandom and cons.

Becoming more of a working girl has made it more difficult for me to get out there and enjoy them over the last few years, but it hasn’t stopped me from loving stories that ineveniblity come out of them. Here are four books I absolutely ADORE that all focus on convention culture and waving your geek flag high and mighty. Definitely check out these books, they will make you smile.

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The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love by Sarvenaz Tash

The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love was a book I picked up on a whim while I was at work browsing our new arrivals section. The cover seems a bit corny, but the contents inside this book? Utterly delightful. This is the story of one guy’s quest to tell the girl he loves how he feels by taking her to Comic Con. However, nothing is ever as it seems, and shenanigans are afoot. I loved this book so much! It reminded me of my own con-romance that I had with my now-husband (which no, we didn’t meet at a con, we were lab partners in school, but we were reunited at a con). There is just so great entertainment and this book does an amazing job of painting the convention backdrop with a great amount of authenticity. If you want a book that depicts the fun in conventions, definitely look no further.

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Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde

While Queens of Geek doesn’t release until next March, I had the chance to read this one and early, and my goodness is it a favourite. I am not a huge romance reader, but conventions really do lend themselves to the romance genre well. This book isn’t specifically about convention romances, but it does look at how deeply fandom runs in people and how far we are willing to go to follow our con-related dreams. This is another book that again authentically portrays convention life and how insane con weekends can really be. I thought both plot-lines in this book were just utterly fabulous and I think Charlie, Taylor and Jamie really do a great job of stealing the reader’s hearts.

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Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy by Sam Maggs

The only non-fiction book on this list but important none the less, Sam Maggs’ Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy is a handbook for the modern geek gal that offers a plethora of information from cosplaying to convention etiquette, to simply ‘how to survive cons.’ This book is written with charm and wit, and Sam Maggs knows how to deliver thoughtful information with quite the one-two punch. If you’ve never been to a convention, or are afraid to share your geek pride beyond your peers, this book offers a lot of great tips to discovering fandom and first time convention goers. This is an essential handbook for con-life, yo.

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One Con Glory by Sarah Kuhn

Last book on this list is the first book I had ever read that was set in an convention. This is a very sassy read about a young woman who is constantly forced to show her geek cred, how she combats it, and how she kicks major ass. This book is adorable, it’s clever, and Julie is just such a misanthrope with her fellow nerds (Think April Ludgate in Parks & Recreation and you have Julie). While this book is far from perfect, it was Kuhn’s first novel, and I still think even now it’s worth the read just show readers can see that rougher side to conventions. Seriously no one should have to constantly prove their geek cred, and those that do that? Shame on you!

I hope this list of recommendations helps to get you excited for the 2017 convention season. I am hoping to make it back to a convention of some kind in 2017, but we will see given that life works in mysterious ways. Definitely check these books out and let me know what you think of them down in the comments below.

Late to the Party ARC Review – The Gallery of Lost Species by Nina Berkhout

26114471Title: The Gallery of Lost Species

Author: Nina Berkhout

Rating: ★★★

Synopsis: Edith grows up in her big sister Vivienne’s shadow. While the beautiful Viv is forced by the girls’ overbearing mother to compete in child beauty pageants, plain-looking Edith follows in her father’s footsteps: collecting oddities, studying coins, and reading from old books.

When Viv rebels against her mother’s expectations, Edith finds herself torn between a desire to help her sister and pursuing her own love for a boy who might love her sister more than he loves her. When Edith accepts a job at the National Gallery of Canada, she meets an elderly cryptozoologist named Theo who is searching for a bird many believe to be extinct. Navigating her way through Vivienne’s dark landscape while trying to win Liam’s heart, Edith develops an unlikely friendship with Theo when she realizes they might have more in common than she imagined; they are both trying to retrieve something that may be impossible to bring back to life.

Huge thank you to St. Martin’s Press for sending me a copy of this book for review!

Molly’s Review:

This book was just okay for me. It’s an adult novel but the main character, Edith, is a teen and then in her early twenties for the entire book, so it’s bordering on the YA side of things. I went into this expecting things from the synopsis and it really didn’t deliver.

I did enjoy the writing and the story of the two sisters. Edith and her sister Viv are two very different girls. Edith loves to read and collect junk with her father while Viv lets her mother parade her around in child beauty pageants. The mother is a piece of work and I loved how complex her relationship was with Viv. Viv is also an artist, like her father, but she succumbs to drug and alcohol abuse and kinda ruins her artistic career.

Edith grows up into a normal young woman and she gets a job at an art gallery. She works in the collections room cataloging items. I was lead to believe that she was going to forge a deep friendship with one of the researchers who frequents the collections room and that that was going to be a core part of the story. But that was very brief and I didn’t even feel like their friendship and connection went that deeply. I was also disappointed that there wasn’t more done with the researchers quest for the mythical extinct bird.

And the whole love story with Liam was just weird and kinda gross and I didn’t really like him or the relationships that he had with either sister. I felt like Edith was rather pathetic when it came to Liam and even when she did get into a normal relationship she was still kinda pathetic about it.

And Viv’s ending was very unsatisfactory. I really was disappointed with the lack of resolution with her and her family.

Overall this book looks and sounds like it’s going to be gorgeous but it’s kinda just meh.

ARC Review – The Ghost Rebellion (Ministry of Peculiar Occurrences #5) by Pip Ballantine & Tee Morris

26814043Title: The Ghost Rebellion (Ministry of Peculiar Occurrences #5)

Author: Pip Ballantine & Tee Morris

Rating: ★★★★

Synopsis: The chase is on! After rescuing Queen Victoria from the clutches of the Maestro, Agents Eliza D Braun and Wellington Books are in hot pursuit of Dr Henry Jekyll. While he continues his experiments on the aristocracy of Europe, he leaves a trail of chaos and despair in his wake. However when Eliza and Wellington run him to ground in India, they are forced to come face to face with ghosts from the past, and the realities of empire.

Meanwhile Ministry agents Brandon Hill and Bruce Campbell travel deep into Russia hunting down a rare ingredient to save Queen Victoria’s life. Amid the cold they uncover a threat from the revitalized House of Usher that comes directly from their new Chairman.

All in the Ministry of Peculiar Occurrences will find their allegiances in question, and their mettle tested as a new dastardly era of international intrigue dawns.

Huge thank you to the author for this ARC! This is no way effects my review.

Sam’s Review:

I have read every book in the Ministry of Peculiar Occurrencesseries, and have loved each one for different reasons. It’s hard not to love Books and Braun, as their steamy chemistry and kick butt attitudes always make for fun dialogue and crazy adventures.

The Ghost Rebellion is a great instalment to the series, and one chock full of mystery and adventure. I was completely invested in the mystery behind the Ghost Rebellion, and I found a lot of the Interludes this time to be quite gripping. It took me a bit to realize some of the connection this time around, but there was certainly a lot more “aha” moments this time around. A lot of the new characters were really interesting, though some of them, particularly O’Neill, were quite frusrating (and rightfully so).

I completely flew through this installment. There is just so much action, and even the politics in this novel were just facisnating to read about. I found myself captivated by the way in which Hill and Campbell handled certain situations, as well as how they dealt with some of the cultural issues as well (the situation with the Russian… oh boy). I actually liked their plotline a lot. Plus, so happy this didn’t end on a cliffhanger! Because the last few have driven me crazy because of that!

But the dialogue was on point, the comedy was still golden, and I am always happy to fall back into this universe. There’s always so much adventure, and the sexual tension! (Well, that isn’t sexual tension so much anymore) is still wonderfully steamy. While this isn’t my favourite installment of the series, I’ll definitely still be recommending it to my fantasy readers at the library.

Late to the Party ARC Review – Mayumi and the Sea of Happiness by Jennifer Tseng

23399029Title: Mayumi and the Sea of Happiness

Author: Jennifer Tseng

Rating: ★★★

Synopsis: Books may be Mayumi Saito’s greatest love and her one source of true pleasure. Forty-one years old, disenchanted wife and dutiful mother, Mayumi’s work as a librarian on a small island off the coast of New England feeds her passion for reading and provides her with many occasions for wry observations on human nature, but it does little to remedy the mundanity of her days. That is, until the day she issues a library card to a shy seventeen-year-old boy and swiftly succumbs to a sexual obsession that subverts the way she sees the library, her family, the island she lives on, and ultimately herself.
 
Wary of the consequences of following through on her fantasies, Mayumi hesitates at first. But she cannot keep the young man from her thoughts. After a summer of overlong glances and nervous chitchat in the library, she finally accepts that their connection is undeniable. In a sprawling house emptied of its summer vacationers, their affair is consummated and soon consolidated thanks to an explosive charge of erotic energy. Mayumi’s life is radically enriched by the few hours each week that she shares with the young man, and as their bond grows stronger thanks not only to their physical closeness but also to their long talks about the books they both love, those hours spent apart seem to Mayumi increasingly bleak and intolerable. As her obsession worsens, in a frantic attempt to become closer to the young man, Mayumi nervously befriends another librarian patron, the young man’s mother. The two women forge a tenuous friendship that will prove vital to both in the most unexpected ways when catastrophe strikes.

Huge thank you to Penguin Canada for this finished copy!

Sam’s Review:

When Mayumi and the Sea of Happiness came through my mailbox, I was both intrigued and worried. I don’t mind books with taboo subject matters, but I was sure I was going to feel quite uncomfortable with the relationship between Mayumi and the Boy. Oddly, I wasn’t as disturbed as I thought I would be, though I did find elements of this book weirder than the taboo relationship.

First I am going to praise the writing, because I did read this book in the span of two days and it’s pretty captivating. Tseng really envelopes the reader into her prose, even when there’s barely anything going on story-wise. The story itself goes through four seasons of Mayumi and the Boy’s relationship, her connection to Violet, his mother, and the worry that she will be discovered by her husband and others. That is the whole book in a nutshell, and yet the prose really makes the reader feel connected to what is going on.

That being said, I disliked Mayumi’s character and the stereotyping of librarians in the novel. That rubbed me the wrong way more than the relationship between Mayumi and the Boy, because there is this stupid assumption that library people, though friendly, don’t want to talk or really deal with patrons (not true, by the way). Mayumi plays into this stereotype so badly, and makes for frustrating character to care about. There’s no real drama in the novel, no real climax. The ending is pretty much a cop out given this larger build that were are given between Mayumi and the Boy. In a lot of ways, I felt rather cheated.

But I kept reading on, because seriously, Tseng’s prose and descriptions were what kept me going. Mayumi and the Sea of Happiness isn’t a bad book at all, but there’s larger holes that don’t get filled very well. If the taboo subject matter isn’t your thing, I’d definitely recommend staying clear, but if you can get past that, there is an interesting narrative being discussed here.

ARC Review – Relativity by Antonia Hayes

25814254Title: Relativity

Author: Antonia Hayes

Rating: ★★★

Synopsis: Twelve-year-old Ethan Forsythe, an exceptionally talented boy obsessed with physics and astronomy, has been raised alone by his mother in Sydney, Australia. Claire, a former professional ballerina, has been a wonderful parent to Ethan, but he’s becoming increasingly curious about his father’s absence in his life. Claire is fiercely protective of her talented, vulnerable son—and of her own feelings. But when Ethan falls ill, tied to a tragic event that occurred during his infancy, her tightly-held world is split open.

Thousands of miles away on the western coast of Australia, Mark is trying to forget about the events that tore his family apart, but an unexpected call forces him to confront his past and return home. When Ethan secretly intercepts a letter from Mark to Claire, he unleashes long-suppressed forces that—like gravity—pull the three together again, testing the limits of love and forgiveness.

Huge thank you to Simon & Schuster Canada for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

Relativity was a book I had heard nothing about until it appeared in my mailbox. I’ve been trying to get myself to read more adult fiction again, despite running a mainly MG and YA focused blog. There’s a lot of good in this book, though for me there was also a lot that held it back as well.

The book follows three main characters, Claire, Mark and Ethan, who are all family. Ethan has a unique generic case where he is able to see physics. He also has been separated from his father, Mark, for many years and wants to be reunited with him. Claire, Ethan’s mother, believes that the amount of sacrifices she had made for her family has amounted to her neglecting her own needs in life, but still feels as though she can’t put her needs before that of her child.

I really dug the emotional struggles that were present in the novel, because each of the characters all had different problems resulting in a need for wanting to be selfish. Claire has made sacrifices to no end but doesn’t feel valued, Mark wants his career and a family but doesn’t want to make either of these actually work, and Ethan is the product of two people who in a lot of ways didn’t necessarily want him for different reasons. It’s really sad to watch a lot of these people falling a part and the novel doesn’t really allow them to entirely get back together either.

That being said, while the plot was interesting, the writing was kind of bland. It was either over saturated in metaphors or everything felt so plain and direct. While I could sense the emotional struggles within the characters, sometimes I felt like the writing wasn’t able to convey that strongly. It definitely had it’s heartfelt moments, which I think fit the tone of the story well, and I liked the level of research that went into describing Ethan’s Shaken Baby Syndrome, and the backstory to that was intriguing, but I wish the writing did a better job of making me emote as a reader.

Relativity is a decent read, and I think for some readers will be an easy book to connect with. The overall story is really interesting and well put together, even if I found the writing a bit overdone or even lacking in places. It’s great for those though who want to be invested in a small scale story with only a handful of characters.

Book Review – Dead Endings by Jessica Chavez & Irene Flores

23363286Title: Dead Endings

Author:  Jessica Chavez & Irene Flores

Rating:  ★★★★★

Synopsis: In the city that never sleeps, spirits are equally restless and vie for the attentions of those who can sense them. Cailen Delaney, grad student and long-suffering ghost magnet, would rather spend her break getting reacquainted with her pillow, but is instead dragged into the aftermath of a strange series of murders by Everett Jung. Join Jessica Chavez (author) and Irene Flores (illustrator) through the streets of modern New York in this darkly comedic mystery about the connection between life and death…and how sometimes, literally, the separation is razor-thin.

Sam’s Review:

This review may seem a tad bias since I am friends with the author, but screw it, even if I wasn’t friends with her I probably still would have loved this book.

This book. Oh lord this book, did I laugh, cry and have all the feelings. Jessica Chavez, if you aren’t familiar with her work in video games, is a fantastic localization writer, but if I’m frankly, she’s just a fantastic writer writer (and she would kill me for the multiple uses of ‘fantastic’ and ‘writer’, on the other hand, I have stoked her ego as well!)

Dead Endings follows grad student who is a ghost magnet Cailen Delaney, and her alcohol-fueled misadventures in dealing with the undead who are refusing to rest. She’s sassy, snarky, and really just wishes you’d leave her the hell alone. Along with the head of her roommate, Gabriela and the quirky Everett, together they attempt to engage the spirits so regular folk don’t have to.

The story is this great blend of snark and seriousness. Chavez really knows how to play to her strengths in writing, mainly in her skill of writing witty character banter. There’s strong character interaction as well, and it makes for a real delight when the trio are together. Couple this with Irene Florez’s beautiful illustration work, and it just makes for an awesome experience. Seriously, they are gorgeous and they really being Chavez’s words to life in a way that makes for a great reading experience.

If you love snark, booze humour, paranormal adventures, and quirky characters, Dead Endings will delight from start to finish. I look forward to whatever else Jessica writers in the feature, and I can only hope there will be much more in the Dead Endings universe.

ARC Review – This Was Not the Plan by Cristina Alger

25111016Title: This Was Not the Plan

Author:  Cristina Alger

Rating:  ★★★★★

Synopsis: Charlie Goldwyn’s life hasn’t exactly gone according to plan. Widowerhood at thirty-three and twelve-hour workdays have left a gap in his relationship with his quirky five-year-old son, Caleb, whose obsession with natural disasters and penchant for girls’ clothing have made him something of a loner at his preschool. The only thing Charlie has going for him is his job at a prestigious law firm, where he is finally close to becoming a partner.

But when a slight lapse in judgment at an office party leaves him humiliatingly unemployed, stuck at home with Caleb for the summer, and forced to face his own estranged father, Charlie starts to realize that there’s more to fatherhood than financially providing for his son, and more to being a son than overtaking his father’s successes.

Huge thank you to Simon & Schuster Canada for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

If I’m being honest, I don’t review a lot of a adult novels. It’s not because I don’t enjoy them, it’s usually because our blog has such a higher focus on young adult and middle grade. That being said, when I received This Was Not The Plan in the mail, part of me was a tad confused why I was getting it. Then I read the note inside from who sent it to me and decided I needed to give it a shot.

There’s not a lot of books out there that focus on male widows, let alone ones who are single parents. Charlie is a lawyer who works insane hours while his sister, Zadie, takes care of this son. When Charlie has a drunkin’ meltdown at a cocktail meeting, his feelings of what it means to be a corporate lawyer “protecting the bad guys” goes viral on YouTube, costing him his job. Forced to leave his position, it gives Charlie a chance to reconnect with his family, more particularly his son, in what turns out to be one of the crazy family reunions I’ve ever read about.

I loved Charlie as a character. Despite being uptight and very corporate, you get a sense that when he loses his job that “it wasn’t the plan.” Furthermore, this lack of planning continues to spiral in the novel, as so much more of his life goes from being planned to unplanned in the blink of an eye. He was married to a woman who didn’t believe in planning. Everything we learn about Charlie’s wife Mira is just interesting, and you get a sense that both characters couldn’t be more opposite to each other and yet they worked so well. The overarching theme of what it means to plan versus life just happening was quite inspiring at times, and it made for an engaging reading experience.

My favourite character by far was Zadie, though. She’s much more free-spirited and has a strong desire to teach her older brother how to live a little. The fact that he behaves like he is afraid to is part of the issue, but Zadie gives so much insight in terms of how living your life versus life living you can ultimately destroy a person’s well being. I also loved her relationship with Caleb, and I loved that she allowed him to express himself in any way he desired. I thought it was great how she also taught Charlie about how to accept Caleb’s openness for pink tutus and Dora the Explorer. I enjoyed that there wasn’t a romance really in this novel. Not that it would have been bad, but the author does this fantastic job of showing how Charlie just isn’t ready yet. Even if he thinks he’s ready, there’s that part of his that still hasn’t grieved his wife, that hasn’t had time to be the kind of dad he wants to be.

This novel is a fantastic read, and one that grabbed me right from the get-go. The characters in this novel are imperfect, but loveable. This is for lovers of contemporary fiction, and those who love stories about family. This Was Not The Plan ended up being a surprise favourite for me, and I hope others check it out and enjoy the overall message it illustrates.