Tag Archives: edelweiss

ARC Review – The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

23830990Title:  The Rest of Us Just Live Here

Author: Patrick Ness

Rating:  ★★★★ / ★★★ 1/2

Synopsis: What if you aren’t the Chosen One? The one who’s supposed to fight the zombies, or the soul-eating ghosts, or whatever the heck this new thing is, with the blue lights and the death? What if you’re like Mikey? Who just wants to graduate and go to prom and maybe finally work up the courage to ask Henna out before someone goes and blows up the high school. Again.

Because sometimes there are problems bigger than this week’s end of the world, and sometimes you just have to find the extraordinary in your ordinary life. Even if your best friend is worshipped by mountain lions.

Huge thank you to the publisher for letting me read an advanced copy of this book!

River’s Review:

This book was SO MUCH FUN! I’ve actually never read a Ness book before (I know, sue me, but they’re LONG…) and I need to fix that soon. I really enjoyed this book. I liked the way it was written, I liked the magical realism and all of the characters were really awesome.

This is a story about the people that are NOT involved with saving the world. The Harrys, the Buffys, the Sam & Deans. Those guys, they save the world. And they’re pretty awesome at it. But what about the guys who aren’t saving the world? The regular old guys that just have to sit by and watch those other awesome dudes save the world? Sure, the muggles in The Chosen One stories don’t always know about the conflicts, the vampires, the witches, but they do have some sense of the fall out (gas leaks, water mains bursting, random never-before-heard-of-illnesses killing off the local folks). I loved that in this book they KNEW about the zombies and ghosts and vampires that were invading the world.

And they knew that they couldn’t do anything about it because it wasn’t THEIR story.

In this book there’s The Chosen Ones (refereed to as the Indie kids, which cracked me the HELL up because I was kinda an indie kid in college even though I would NEVER have admitted it) and then The Rest of Us. The main characters are The Rest of Us: Mikey (who has OCD), his older sister Mel (who’s recovering from an eating disorder), his younger sister Meredith (who just struggles with being 10 years old and wanting to go to her favorite boy band concert), his neighbor and best friend Henna (who struggled with her super religious parents), and his other best friend Jared (who is half god and worshiped by cats. And also gay). Everyone has their faults, they deal with them in strange ways, and help each other out. They live, laugh, fight, love and wonder wtf is going on in their town THIS time.

I think what I loved the most about this was how it was at times just a normal contemporary dealing with issues that a lot of teens face (and are just becoming things that are “okay” to talk about and seek help with) but then in the background there’s the freaking end of the world! And Indie kids are dying and saving the world and the sections that were about the Indie kids just SLAYED ME. I loved the writing and the mix of mystical with the contemporary and how it was all just so normal. A lot of it made me laugh, a lot of it felt like an inside joke that I was IN on and I loved it.

Overall I’m not sure how this compares to Ness’ other books, but for me this was a great introduction to him.

Sam’s Review:

I admit, I haven’t read a lot of Patrick Ness’ works, and the ones I have read I’ve either absolutely adored or been completely ‘meh’ on. I took a gamble with The Rest of Us Just Live Here after hearing about it at Frenzy Presents (hosted by HarperCollins Canada) and I can honestly say I thought this was quite the fun book! Patrick Ness is fantastic at immersion in his stories, crafting weird and wonderful scenarios, and this book was no different.

The Rest of Us Just Live Here focuses on those who are not “The Chosen One.” The ones who have to suffer the consequences and actions of “The Chosen One” as they fight to protect the world around them. Some days are more catastrophic than others, and this idea is done with a lot of humour. You can also tell Ness is a huge Buffy nerd, because there are some references in the novel that just prove that point and drive it home!

Although I’ve given you a small glimpse on what the book is about, it’s hard to really categorize what it is supposed to be. Is it fantasy? Paranormal? Contemporary? The Rest of Us Just Live Here really is a mish-mash of genres rolled into one engaging package. I admit, the use of genre bending threw me off once in awhile, and I’d have to reread parts to make sure I understood what Ness’ intention was. I admit, I did find parts of the novel dragged, but for me it was this weird level of rollercoaster enjoyment, where it felt very up and down. Ness’ has a very unique writing style, and it’s definitely not for everyone (hence why some books have worked for me and others haven’t).

It’s weird to say, but I actually loved the plotline with the indie kids more than I did the Unchosen Ones. There was so much satire and humour in those moments, and when the indie kids plot mixed together with the Unchosen Ones plotline, that was when I found the book the most enjoyable and entertaining. The bit with the Finns? Absolutely genius. But when it was just about the day-to-day with the Unchosen Ones, I did find at times that the book wasn’t always as gripping as I wanted it to be. I also didn’t find the main characters to be as interesting compared to the Chosen Ones, and again that could have been more me than the book given that I was more interested in the satire side of the novel.

That being said, I think that this might be one of Patrick Ness’ most unique books to-date, but it did not top A Monster Calls, which still remains my favourite book of his. I think that if you’re a fan of Buffy the Vampire Slayer or Joss Whedon style humour, you’ll find a lot to enjoy in this novel, but the story part I think will be quite hit-or-miss for some readers depending on what kind of expectations that have for this book. Truthfully, this to me isn’t the Patrick Ness book to start with (I still say The Knife of Never Letting Go or A Monster Calls really is where to start), however, I think this book will be quite the hit with those can appreciate the playfulness that Patrick Ness infuses into this world. I just wish I had liked the characters a lot more.

Late to the Party ARC Review – Uprooted by Naomi Novik

22544764Title: Uprooted

Author: Naomi Novik

Rating: ★★★★★

Synopsis: Agnieszka loves her valley home, her quiet village, the forests and the bright shining river. But the corrupted Wood stands on the border, full of malevolent power, and its shadow lies over her life. Her people rely on the cold, driven wizard known only as the Dragon to keep its powers at bay. But he demands a terrible price for his help: one young woman handed over to serve him for ten years, a fate almost as terrible as falling to the Wood.

The next choosing is fast approaching, and Agnieszka is afraid. She knows—everyone knows—that the Dragon will take Kasia: beautiful, graceful, brave Kasia, all the things Agnieszka isn’t, and her dearest friend in the world. And there is no way to save her. But Agnieszka fears the wrong things. For when the Dragon comes, it is not Kasia he will choose.

Huge thank you to the publisher for providing me an ARC of this book!

Sam’s Review:

I am a huge Naomi Novik fan, especially since His Majesty’s Dragon released years ago. Her books do an amazing job of blending alternative history an the fantastical together to create a gripping world that is always interesting to embark in. Her latest novel, Uprooted, is a departure in this regard, as it’s still fantasy, there still be dragons, but is much more traditional in nature. And it’s perfect.

What I love about Uprooted is that in a lot of cases, the book is not entirely what it seems. We have a “Dragon” abducting women and “sacrificing them,” we have a wood that is much more alive than those realize, and a heroine by the name of Agnieszka who must learn magic as a means to push the malevolent woods back, before it destroys everything in the valley and all the people she has sworn to protect.

This is a gorgeously written book that oozes wonderful and raw description. Moreover, Novik uses her skills to craft this very sinister world, one which feels disjointed and suffocating. The Woods are as much of a character in the story than one would notice at first, and it’s a testament to Novik’s skill that we are given a Woods that is very much alive and out to destroy the world. Oddly, the Woods was my favourite character, and I loved the way in which its described, and the way it has the power to foil the characters in the story. That’s not to say I didn’t love the heroine,
Agnieszka, who really is a character that begins as a slow burn and then blossoms into this wise, tough individual who knows there’s so much riding on her success. Agnieszka struggles with failure, she’s sympathetic, and she’s someone who wants to do and see good in everyone and everything. I loved her for it.

And that’s really it: all the characters in this book have a great amount of depth and complexity to them. Agnieszka takes Kasia’s place, you know in that instance their relationship changes in a way that isn’t necessarily for the better. The Dragon is such a gruff guy, and yet he does show care and compassion towards Agnieszka, even if it’s somewhat digressive in nature. The characters and their dynamics work wonderfully, and the story is gripping from start to finish. I cared about these characters and the world they are living in.

If you’ve never read a Naomi Novik novel or you’re intimidated by the size of the Temeraire series, then I implore you to give Uprooted a go. It’s delicious dark, but it’ll scratch the itch of any fantasy fan who loves deep description and wonderfully fleshed out characters. This is easily a new favourite novel by her for me!

ARC Review – Tonight the Streets Are Ours by Leila Sales

23310761Title: Tonight the Streets Are Ours

Author: Leila Sales

Rating: ★★★

Synopsis: Seventeen-year-old Arden Huntley is recklessly loyal. Taking care of her loved ones is what gives Arden purpose in her life and makes her feel like she matters. But she’s tired of being loyal to people who don’t appreciate her—including her needy best friend and her absent mom.

Arden finds comfort in a blog she stumbles upon called “Tonight the Streets Are Ours,” the musings of a young New York City writer named Peter. When Peter is dumped by the girlfriend he blogs about, Arden decides to take a road trip to see him.

During one crazy night out in NYC filled with parties, dancing, and music—the type of night when anything can happen, and nearly everything does—Arden discovers that Peter isn’t exactly who she thought he was. And maybe she isn’t exactly who she thought she was, either.

Huge thank you to Macmillan/Raincoast Books for letting us read an advanced copy!

River’s Review:

First off I want to say that the only reason I read this so soon is because it was one of those ‘will expire in 60 days’ deals and I didn’t want to forget about it and have it expire and have to re-download it or whatever cuz then I would have just skipped it. And I did not want to skip this book. This Song Will Save Your Life is a favorite of mine and I was really excited to see another book coming out by the same author.

Sadly this just didn’t do it for me like TSWSYL. Everything was just a little flat for me and I had trouble connecting with or liking anyone. The writing was tight, but lacked the emotion that TSWSYL did. I wasn’t able to connect to Arden or Lindsey at all. The little brother annoyed the crap out of me, the dad needed a good dose of reality (which he got) and the mother… I was torn on her. I wanted to be mad at her and tell her to wait until her kids were older to run off to try and get her shit together, but as an adult woman I could understand her need to get out of the situation she was in.

In Tonight the Streets are Ours Arden tells us a love story. About her friends and family and a random boy she met online. Now, when I read the synopsis of this I thought that she’d formed a relationship (friendship, whatever) with Peter, the author of the ‘Tonight the Streets are Ours’ blog that Arden finds and becomes obsessed with. But they never communicate at all. Arden just reads about his break up with his girlfriend, decides that Peter needs here and takes off to New York City (which is 300 miles away) in her shitty car (srsly, it’s a piece of junk) and her super unreliable best friend Lindsay.

I’m gonna stop right here and say that maybe I’m too old or this book. Because all I could think about was WHAT HAPPENED TO INTERNET SAFETY 101?! Are we no longer teaching teens that it’s NOT OKAY TO MEET STRANGERS FROM THE INTERNET?! Now before you yell at me about how ppl meet online all the time, I grew up with the internet. I was in middle school when regular old people could connect their Gateway desktops to their phone lines and sit there for ten minutes while it dialed up the World Wide Web. My parents watched all of the Dateline episodes about child predators lurking in chat rooms. TV told my parents that THE INTERNET IS DANGEROUS and they listened. That said I did meet TONS of people from the internet later on in life. When I was older. Or supervised by an adult. I met my college roomates and best friends on livejournal. I used to travel across the state to stay the weekend with a girl I met online. I met my husband from the Japanese equivalent of Facebook. I’m all for meeting people online IF YOU KNOW THEM IN SOME CAPACITY BEFOREHAND. So when I say that I did not approve of what Arden did it’s because she DIDN’T KNOW PETER. And as a blogger if some random person read my blog and then drove over 300 miles to meet me WITHOUT HAVING COMMUNICATED WITH ME I would not be pleased. And that was when this book really lost points with me.

Also Adren knows that Peter works at a bookstore in NYC and on their way down Lindsey calls all of them asking if Peter is working and one store is like ‘yeah he’s in today’. And that also scared the crap out of me because I just went through security training at my new job and you’re NEVER supposed to give out personal information over the phone to an unknown party ESPECIALLY SOMETHING LIKE IF THE PERSON IS AT SAID LOCATION. It could be ANYONE calling. A stalker (case in point), an angry family member, an armed psychopath. So yes it’s supposed to be clever on Lindsey’s side, but the actual safety of it made me cringe so much.

Anyway, Adren and Lindsey make it to NYC and they find Peter and meet him and go off with him to a party. ALL THE SAFEST THINGS IN THE WORLD. Arden seems SO proud that she knows all of this stuff about Peter from his blog and he doesn’t find it creepy at all (because Peter turns out to be an asshole), and I don’t know why Arden didn’t feel weird about it (I guess because she felt like she was entitled to Peter from reading about him). Now I’m pretty active on Twitter and I follow some of my friends that I see pretty often on there and once a friend of mine and I were talking and I mentioned something that I’d written on twitter and she was like ‘oh yeah I saw on Twitter’ and then we realized how fucking WEIRD it was and decided that even if we’d already known something from reading it on twitter that we wouldn’t say anything about it because IT IS WEIRD.

Anyway, so I did like that Arden slowly pieced together that most of Peter’s blog was a one-sided version of what he wanted people to know and that he’d actually just been writing in a way that made him look cool/the victim/desirable. That he’d left out entire portions of what was really going on and the real reason why his brother ran away and his girlfriend broke up with him. How he’d used his family’s issues to make him seem unloved when really he was the cause of a lot of the problems! Adren began to see that was someone wrote down on their blog didn’t necessarily mean that’s how they were like in real life and her image of him was shattered.

So if you’re expecting this to be a love story about Arden running off to NYC to find her blogger soulmate, it’s not.

There are also a few moments where Arden finally speaks her mind to her mother, father, Lindsey and her boyfriend. Those were well done and Arden needed to finally speak her mind, but they all seemed a bit canned and didn’t necessarily flow as well as they could have.

Overall this is not a bad book and I’m sure it will work for some people, but alas it just wasn’t meant for me.

Sam’s Review:

One of my favourite books in 2013 was This Song Will Save Your Life. I found the novel moving, something I could relate to in a strong way. Needless to say, I was thrilled that Leila Sales was putting out another novel, one I was hoping to have a much stronger emotional connection towards. I have to admit, however, that while I enjoyed parts of this novel, I struggled to suspend my disbelief in some situations.

I will concede that I loved the idea of this novel being an unexpected love story, and I loved the exploration around this concept. I think Sales does a great job of grabbing the reader’s attention to show obsessed Arden becomes with the blog and the man behind the words. It’s easy to become infatuated with someone else’s words or the way in which they tell their stories, but I admit, I disapproved of Arden’s actions in going to NYC and seeking Peter out in real life.

I just had such a hard time suspending my disbelief for that, and I feel uncomfortable with the idea that someone would go that far to stalk someone’s blog. I recognize that it happens, but my discomfort comes from the fact that it at first comes across quite unwelcomed? Perhaps there’s just a part of me that was confused by how this was supposed to be a romantic gesture of sorts — and like my co-blogger said, there’s that part of me that felt out and questioned how Arden could be so damn trusting towards Peter. I understand that she feels like she knows him, but on the other side of the coin does she really? Again, the level of trust and lack of discomfort really threw me for a loop, and admittedly, I’m surprised that Lindsey as her friend would go along with this (mind you, she’s the more adventurous type compared to Arden). I really enjoyed the reveal in regards to Peter, and I loved that Arden learns how one-sided everything is after confronting him about his relationship with Bianca. I kinda wish Arden had been more upfront with Chris, but I do like how Sales shows cheating as a learning experience, though I still wish she hadn’t done that!

I will say, I actually loved the friendship between Arden and Lindsey. For me, that was the best parts of this novel — the way they had each others back, the way they could call each other on their crap, the way in which they took care of each other was pretty admirable. I also loved Arden’s growth in terms of her family problems and how she eventually is able to speak out about it to her parents and others. For me, those were the more interesting parts of the novel since I struggled to buy into the Peter relationship and the blog stalking. I just found those aspects so hard to connect with mostly because I was screaming STRANGER DANGER every few seconds.

I think Tonight the Streets Are Ours is definitely an engaging read, especially if you can suspend your disbelief with how easy a lot of aspects fall into the place. I found I liked the novel, but was just also very disappointed in how simple and easy a lot of the situations were. I wish there had been more to the consequences, because that really did frustrate me. I’m disappointed that I didn’t enjoy this book the way I did This Song Will Save Your Life, but I do recommend it to those who can suspend their disbelief and enjoy the narrative for what it is.

ARC Review – The Fall by James Preller

21936978Title: The Fall

Author: James Preller

Rating: ★★★

Synopsis: Through his journal a boy deals with the death of a classmate, who committed suicide as a result of bullying.

The summer before school starts, Sam’s friend and classmate Morgan Mallen kills herself. Morgan had been bullied. Maybe she kissed the wrong boy. Or said the wrong thing. What about that selfie that made the rounds? Morgan was this, and Morgan was that. But who really knows what happened?

As Sam explores the events leading up to the tragedy, he must face a difficult and life-changing question: Why did he keep his friendship with Morgan a secret? And could he have done something—anything—to prevent her final actions?


Huge thank you to the publisher for letting me read an advanced copy of this book!

River’s Review:

Overall this is a solid look at suicide, bullying, and peer pressure. It’s told in journal entries by our narrator, Sam, who is trying to figure out and come to terms with the suicide of a classmate. We get to see that Morgan, the girl who jumped to her death, wasn’t just a random classmate. She was the outcast, the social leper, the one that everyone ganged up on. And she was also Sam’s friend.

And he liked her. Like-liked her. And she liked him back.

But we learn that Sam is just your average kid trying to get through high school without making waves. He’s a baseball player, decently liked, and gets along well enough with the popular kids that he is involved in their games. And their favorite game is a sick version of tag where if you’re “it” you have to write something super nasty (and anonymous) on Morgan’s social media site. And Sam admits that he’s a follower and that he follows the flow and that this is what he does.

I liked the voice of this. The writing was simple but clear, and I think it worked well for the story that was being told. Sadly, thought, I think it also didn’t lend well to a lot of depth and emotion which is why I’m giving it a 3 instead of a 4. I liked this, but it didn’t really make me feel anything. It made me think, which is what books like this should do, but it didn’t really rip me up or anything (which is what I want books like this to do).

Overall this is a nice addition to an important genre that explores bullying, suicide, and the ramifications it has on not just those directly effected, but everyone in a peer group.

ARC Review – Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon

18692431Title:  Everything, Everything

Author: Nicola Yoon

Rating:  ★★★ 1/2

Synopsis: My disease is as rare as it is famous. Basically, I’m allergic to the world. I don’t leave my house, have not left my house in seventeen years. The only people I ever see are my mom and my nurse, Carla.

But then one day, a moving truck arrives next door. I look out my window, and I see him. He’s tall, lean and wearing all black—black T-shirt, black jeans, black sneakers, and a black knit cap that covers his hair completely. He catches me looking and stares at me. I stare right back. His name is Olly. Maybe we can’t predict the future, but we can predict some things. For example, I am certainly going to fall in love with Olly. It’s almost certainly going to be a disaster.

Huge than you to the publisher for letting me read an advanced copy of this book!

River’s Review:

So going into this book I’d heard both sides of the spectrum. It’s The Best Book Of This Year. It’s HORRIBLE. I knew there was a twist coming so I’m not sure if I figured it out on my own, or if I was looking for it… but I’m gonna go with a little bit of both.

Going into this book I had set my expectations really low because I’d had a few good book people say that it was terrible. I wanted to give it a shot (and I got it for review) and I’m pleased to say that I did enjoy it. This book is a VERY quick read. I have an eARC, and feel that a physical copy would have enhanced my reading experience due to the illustrations and sections written in email/chat/transcript.

Oddly enough I read this book directly after reading another Big Summer Book with a crazy format (Illumine) and I know that reading a physical book with a unique format is a lot better than reading an e-version. I found myself not caring enough about the illustrations or charts because I just couldn’t read them. And sometimes they felt a little juvenile. I did give Maddy a pass for some of it though because she’d lead quite a sheltered life.

This is a story about a girl who basically, lives in a bubble. She’s allergic to the outside world and anything could trigger a reaction so she’s confined to her home which is sealed off and the air is filtered in. Her only friend is her mother and a handful of internet people. (Which surprised me because I’m totally healthy and leave my house daily and have a TON of internet friends… I imagine that if I couldn’t leave my house on pain of death that I’d have A LOT more internet friends). We never see Maddy interact with any of these people, which idk, seemed odd. She spends her time reading, doing school work online, and playing games/watching movies with her mother.

Then a new family moves in next door and the two siblings try to befriend Maddy. Obviously they can’t meet, but the boy, Olly, is curious. He watches Maddy (in a non-creepy way) through his window and they communicate through gestures and funny antics. They eventually start to email and chat online and then Maddy convinces her nurse to let Olly inside. And they slowly begin to fall for each other.

This romance worked for me. It was subtle and gave me all the feels. I loved how Olly was curious and Maddy was protective and how they were both cautious by not. And when Maddy realizes that living in her bubble isn’t really living, she decides that she doesn’t care if her life is cut short, she just wants to spend time living, with Olly.

This is where the story started to fall apart for me. They suddenly take off to Hawaii and idk. It just struck me as odd. Like, sure it would sound good on paper, maybe something they’d scheme but not actually follow through with… but they actually do it and idk, I just never felt that either of them really had the guts to do it. And of course Maddy gets sick and then the inevitable heartbreak happens.

And then the twist. Which I had started to suspect. And I am very torn on that. The revel was emotional and sad and heartbreaking but at the same time I just wondered how it had kept on for so long.

And the mother. I thought that she was sweet and caring and really dedicated herself to Maddy. I was surprised that she never seemed to blame herself for her daughter’s suffering and then later on I wanted to hate her for the way she treated Maddy, but at the same time I wanted to understand and I guess if we could have seen a deeper side of the mother, a more broken side, a more screwed up side, maybe I could have taken things a little bit better and loved it a little bit more.

The writing in this is very quiet. Some people will enjoy the voice and the style, others will hate it. It’s not a style that I seek out, but when I do stumble upon it I find that it’s refreshing.

Overall I think I liked this more than I would have due to my low expectations and if I’d gone into it thinking it was going to be The Best I would have been disappointed.

Late to the Party ARC Review – Prudence (The Custard Protocol, #1) by Gail Carriger

23562480Title:  Prudence (The Custard Protocol, #1)

Author: Gail Carriger

Rating:  ★★★★

Synopsis: When Prudence Alessandra Maccon Akeldama (Rue to her friends) is given an unexpected dirigible, she does what any sensible female would under similar circumstances — names it the Spotted Custard and floats to India in pursuit of the perfect cup of tea. But India has more than just tea on offer. Rue stumbles upon a plot involving local dissidents, a kidnapped brigadier’s wife, and some awfully familiar Scottish werewolves. Faced with a dire crisis and an embarrassing lack of bloomers, what else is a young lady of good breeding to do but turn metanatural and find out everyone’s secrets, even thousand-year-old fuzzy ones?

Huge thank you to Orbit and Edelweiss for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

I probably should have read this sooner given my fangirl status for Gail Carriger. Sadly, life got in the way and this just didn’t happen as early as I wanted it too. However, given the status of this book for some many years, boy was I finally glad to read it!

Prudence was totally worth waiting for, given all the hiccups before its release. It’s as sassy as the Parasol Protectorate series, but still has it’s own distinctive voice and sense of humour. I loved Rue and her companions, particularly Percy who just had me in stitches for large chunks of the story. Carriger has this amazing ability to write chemistry between her characters, and I feel like in this book the level of success she has is huge.

Furthermore there were cameos of old favourites from Parasol Protectorate, which really just made me grin from ear to ear. Plus since Prudence takes place in the same universe as many of Carriger’s other novels, it just makes everything feel so familiar and comfortable.

For me, I get a sense of comfort when reading a Gail Carriger novel. I know exactly what I am getting: humour, quirk, romance, a grand adventure with some prim and proper attached, and I’m such happy to have those things. This book isn’t without flaw, as it does feel a little samey to the main series, but I didn’t care because I found myself laughing along to Rue and crew’s antics. The comedy was just very spot on in this novel, and sometimes you wanted a book that doesn’t try to hard, and it’s only goal is to make you have a good laugh.

ARC Review – Made You Up by Francesca Zappia

17661416Title: Made You Up

Author: Francesca Zappia

Rating: ★★★★★

Synopsis: Reality, it turns out, is often not what you perceive it to be—sometimes, there really is someone out to get you. Made You Up tells the story of Alex, a high school senior unable to tell the difference between real life and delusion. This is a compelling and provoking literary debut that will appeal to fans of Wes Anderson, Silver Linings Playbook, and Liar.

Alex fights a daily battle to figure out the difference between reality and delusion. Armed with a take-no-prisoners attitude, her camera, a Magic 8-Ball, and her only ally (her little sister), Alex wages a war against her schizophrenia, determined to stay sane long enough to get into college. She’s pretty optimistic about her chances until classes begin, and she runs into Miles. Didn’t she imagine him? Before she knows it, Alex is making friends, going to parties, falling in love, and experiencing all the usual rites of passage for teenagers. But Alex is used to being crazy. She’s not prepared for normal.

Huge thank you to Greenwillow Books & Edelweiss for this ARC!

River’s Review:

I LOVED THIS BOOK! I lived the writing style, the wacky school, Alex’s humor and sincerity and MILES! I freaking LOVED Miles! And their whole little group. It was such a colorful cast of characters.

This is a story about a girl named Alex who has paranoid schizophrenia. She often hallucinates and takes photos with her digital camera to help her understand what’s real and fake. The story starts off with her as a child trying to free the lobsters in the lobster tank at the grocery store. She meets a boy who has the bluest eyes she’s ever seen… and later learns that the whole thing was a delusion.

Years later she’s in her senior year of high school. Getting her last chance. She didn’t do so well in her last school (due to paranoia about communists and a spray paint incident) and you get the feeling that if she doesn’t prove herself this time around something bad is going to happen.

Alex is quirky and not just because of her schizophrenia. She’s just a wacky girl with a good sense of humor. I loved her voice and I loved being inside of her head. So often people are scared of schizophrenics and this really helped me to understand what it might be like for people who suffer from schizophrenia. I felt for Alex and she broke my heart more than once. Towards the end of the book we learn a very sad truth that is devastating for Alex and my heart just broke.

Mile’s is an incredibly interesting character. He’s a genius, he’s a jerk, he’s king of the school. He does ‘jobs’ for people who pay him money to get revenge, get them out of tests, and other odd ball things. He does this because it gives him power. Without that he’s just a nerd from a bad home who gets bullied. And he faces off with Alex, pulling pranks on her, and her pulling them back on him. They slowly form a bond thought and he later figures out that she’s schizophrenic. But he’s very good about it, and takes care of her. There are some of THE sweetest moments between the two of them. And I just loved him. And I also loved how she took care of him when he needed help.

The school they go to is almost it’s own character. There’s a lot of weird stuff going on and I just loved how it added to the story as an almost living background.

Pick this book up guys. It’s brilliant and amazing!