Tag Archives: fantasy

ARC Review – The Daughters of Ys by M.T. Anderson & Jo Rioux

Title: The Daughters of Ys

Author: M.T. Anderson & Jo Rioux

Rating: ★★★ 1/2

Synopsis: Ys, city of wealth and wonder, has a history of dark secrets. Queen Malgven used magic to raise the great walls that keep Ys safe from the tumultuous sea. But after the queen’s inexplicable death, her daughters drift apart. Rozenn, the heir to the throne, spends her time on the moors communing with wild animals, while Dahut, the youngest, enjoys the splendors of royal life and is eager to take part in palace intrigue.

When Rozenn and Dahut’s bond is irrevocably changed, the fate of Ys is sealed, exposing the monsters that lurk in plain view. M. T. Anderson and Jo Rioux reimagine this classic Breton folktale of love, loss, and rebirth, revealing the secrets that lie beneath the surface.

Huge thank you to Raincoast for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

The Daughter of Ys is one of the most beautiful graphic novels I’ve ever had the pleasure of reading. It’s art style is vivid, it’s powerful, and just sweeps you through a somewhat messy and convoluted story. I won’t deny the eye candy of this graphic novel, but I found myself a bit lost a times with the story.

The story is a fairy tale of Queen Malgven, who uses magic to keep out the sea from entering the world of Ys. After her death, her daughters Rozenn and Dahut begin their own quest for personal glories. Rozenn enjoys a life with natural despite being heir to the throne, while Dahut loves and gets lost in political intrigue. There is a lot of murder and uncertainty in the story, and it makes for an interesting tale.

I feel like if I knew what Daughters of Ys was based off of, I would have likely enjoyed it more. The writing is sharp, it’s elegant even at times, but I still found myself a bit lost and having to reread bits. I adored Jo Rioux art style, and felt it did a great job of conveying the discomfort and whimsical elements. I think if you are familiar with the tale its based off of, you’ll get more out of this story. I found it to be an enjoyable read, and perhaps one I’ll revisit with a bit more knowledge behind me.

Late to the Party ARC Review – Blanca & Roja by Anna-Marie McLemore

Title: Blanca & Roja

Author: Anna-Marie McLemore

Rating: ★★★★

Synopsis: The del Cisne girls have never just been sisters; they’re also rivals, Blanca as obedient and graceful as Roja is vicious and manipulative. They know that, because of a generations-old spell, their family is bound to a bevy of swans deep in the woods. They know that, one day, the swans will pull them into a dangerous game that will leave one of them a girl, and trap the other in the body of a swan.

But when two local boys become drawn into the game, the swans’ spell intertwines with the strange and unpredictable magic lacing the woods, and all four of their fates depend on facing truths that could either save or destroy them. Blanca & Roja is the captivating story of sisters, friendship, love, hatred, and the price we pay to protect our hearts.

Huge thank you to Raincoast for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

Can I just say how much I love Anna-Marie McLemore’s books? They are such a whirlwind of magic, curiosity, and discomfort. At least, that is definitely what reading Blanca & Roja was like. This story is a dark fairy tale about two sisters, swans, and familial expectations. There are four protagonists, each who get wrapped up into this weird, wild story about sisters, and how they all must face what demons posses them in order to feel a sense of freedom.

I read this book in a day as I was trapped in my car while waiting for my sick dog to be checked out at the vet. I was completely engrossed in the story from the first page, and totally loved the twists and turns of who the “liar” was between Blanca and Roja. In the end, I was more a Roja fan in that her anger and frustrations felt so real and something I could in a way, identify with. There is an amazing discussion in this book about being non-binary and gender-fluid, and they are done in a way that for those who are unfamiliar can understand it well.

Anna-Marie McLemore is one of those writers where they have an amazing grasp of the written language. Their books are beautifully written and they truly transport readers into worlds that are not familiar, but feel familiar, which is always a challenge when writing magical realism. I am sad it took me so long to finally read this book, and I cannot wait to read the other two books I have by them that are sitting on my shelf. If you want something dark, twisted, that will keep you guessing, then read Blanca & Roja as it will not disappoint.

 

ARC Review – The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin

Title: The City We Became

Author: N.K. Jemisin

Rating: ★★★★ 1/2

Synopsis: Every city has a soul. Some are as ancient as myths, and others are as new and destructive as children. New York City? She’s got five.

But every city also has a dark side. A roiling, ancient evil stirs beneath the earth, threatening to destroy the city and her five protectors unless they can come together and stop it once and for all.

Huge thank you to Hachette Book Group Canada for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

This is my first N.K Jemisin novel. I had read short stories by the author and a lot of her essay work, but this was the first book I physical grabbed and decided to take the plunge with. The City We Became is a fascinating, superhero-esque story, full of so many New Yorkers, some just trying to live their lives, and others who are fulfilling a larger purpose.

This book is brilliant, smart, disturbing, crazy, and might be one of the best love letter’s to NYC imaginable. So much of this story asks the reader to use their imagination, to suspend as much disbelief as possible, and focus on a large scale battle between the major neighborhoods, each with their own desire for power. The city’s five protectors can’t agree with one another, and there’s a big bad coming to destroy New York and swallow it whole.

I LOVED this book. It was so weird and intense throughout, and I loved how every NYC neighborhood had a distinctive personality and character that I am sure feels true to life. The way in which characters come together to fight this apocalyptic event has note of humour, and a great amount of terror. The City We Became has such a great premise, a fantastic ensemble cast, and will keep you turning pages long into the night.

ARC Review – Gloom Town by Ronald L. Smith

Title: Gloom Town

Author: Ronald L. Smith

Rating: ★★★ 1/2

Synopsis: When twelve-year-old Rory applies for a job at a spooky old mansion in his gloomy seaside town, he finds the owner, Lord Foxglove, odd and unpleasant. But he and his mom need the money, so he takes the job anyway. Rory soon finds out that his new boss is not just strange, he’s not even human—and he’s trying to steal the townspeople’s shadows. Together, Rory and his friend Isabella set out to uncover exactly what Foxglove and his otherworldly accomplices are planning and devise a strategy to defeat them. But can two kids defeat a group of ancient evil beings who are determined to take over the world?

Huge thank you to Raincoast for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

Gloom Town is the story of twelve-year-old Rory, who decided to apply for a job at a spooky mansion called Foxglove, as a means to help out his mother who is financially struggling. Rory thinks the job should be easy, until he uncovers that their may be something more sinister going on at the manor. Rory finds out that his new employer is a shadowy figure who likes to steal people’s shadows — he’s not even human! Rory and his new friend Izzy must stop the crazy cultists of Foxglove Manor before more people potentially lose their shadows!

This book was a lot of fun and I quite enjoyed it. It definitely has a spooky Harriet The Spy vibe floating through the narrative and Rory and Izzy make for fun investigators to follow. I sort of wished the big bad in this story felt like a real big bad, but I appreciate the effort that went into this book for understanding that cultists might in fact be hard to pitch to a middle grade audience. The friendship between Izzy and Rory is easily the book’s strongest element, especially as they are trying to uncover the big bad, but I just wish that the big bad and it’s reveal had been stronger.

I do think this is going to be a great book to recommend to middle grader fans, if only because it moves at such a quick pace and the mystery element is good, even if the payoff isn’t as strong. There is a lot of fun and quirkiness in this story, and I truly enjoyed my time reading it.

Two Fantastic Graphic Novels

One o f my goals this year is to try and highlight more awesome, standalone graphic novels. Here are two recent reads I absolutely adored!


Title: The Okay Witch

Author: Emma Steinkellner

Published: September 3rd 2019 by Aladdin

Thoughts: I loved this graphic novel! There’s the right amount of magic and whimsy! There is also a fantastic message about loving the skin your in and building your self-confidence. Reminded me a bit of Kiki’s Delivery Service, aka my favourite Studio Ghibli movie! This graphic novel is great for anyone who loves a witchy tale or about personal growth (and magic usage!)

 

Title: Go With the Flow

Author: Lily Williams & Karen Schneemann

Published: January 14th 2020 by First Second

Thoughts: Essential reading that needs to be in every public and school library. This book is amazing! It is a fantastic friendship story, it’s also a great book that looks at how unique and different each woman’s period is. This book is all about ensuring equal access to feminine hygiene products in all schools with the hope of ensuring that girls everywhere can get the support they need. This book is funny, it is gorgeously illustrated, and it’s clever as all heck.


What are some great, recent graphic novels on your radar?

Late to the Party ARC Review – Wayward Son by Rainbow Rowell

Title: Wayward Son

Author: Rainbow Rowell

Rating: ★★★ 1/2

Synopsis: The story is supposed to be over.

Simon Snow did everything he was supposed to do. He beat the villain. He won the war. He even fell in love. Now comes the good part, right? Now comes the happily ever after…

So why can’t Simon Snow get off the couch?

What he needs, according to his best friend, is a change of scenery. He just needs to see himself in a new light…

That’s how Simon and Penny and Baz end up in a vintage convertible, tearing across the American West.

They find trouble, of course. (Dragons, vampires, skunk-headed things with shotguns.) And they get lost. They get so lost, they start to wonder whether they ever knew where they were headed in the first place…

Huge thank you to Raincoast for this finished copy!

Sam’s Review:

I admit, I think I read Carry On at a wrong period in my life and since rereading it, I have a bit more appreciation for the story. I knew when I received Wayward Son, I was going to need to reread the first book because I barely remembered what happened. Wayward Son offers an entertaining road trip story, that is totally fun and fancy free.

What I liked and disliked about this book is that there are more perspectives in it. It was fun to have Penelope’s perspective, but I was sad (even with the plot points) that there wasn’t a lot for Agatha. I didn’t entirely care for a lot of the new characters, but I did adore the shenanigans throughout the story in terms of learning about America, and dealing with a vampire coven.

Wayward Sons is pure fun, but it doesn’t add a lot to this series. I still think I will read the third book when it releases, but I am hoping it will solidly finished up the flufftastic adventures of Simon and Baz. Silly Simon and Baz!

Late to the Party ARC Review – Crier’s War (Crier’s War #1) by Nina Varela

Title: Crier’s War (Crier’s War #1)

Author: Nina Varela

Rating: ★★★ 1/2

Synopsis: After the War of Kinds ravaged the kingdom of Rabu, the Automae, designed to be the playthings of royals, usurped their owners’ estates and bent the human race to their will.

Now Ayla, a human servant rising in the ranks at the House of the Sovereign, dreams of avenging her family’s death…by killing the sovereign’s daughter, Lady Crier.

Crier was Made to be beautiful, flawless, and to carry on her father’s legacy. But that was before her betrothal to the enigmatic Scyre Kinok, before she discovered her father isn’t the benevolent king she once admired, and most importantly, before she met Ayla.

Now, with growing human unrest across the land, pressures from a foreign queen, and an evil new leader on the rise, Crier and Ayla find there may be only one path to love: war.

Huge thank you to Harper Collins for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

I heard about Crier’s War when I went to Harper Collins Canada’s Fall Frenzy event. Some buzz words the book had were adventure, politics, revenge, and a lesbian romance. I love all those things in my fantasy novels, so I knew I needed to get my hands on this book, and lo and behold it was in my grab bag.

I enjoyed Crier’s War. It’s not the most ground breaking fantasy novel, there’s a lot that has been done before, and yet I devoured the story and found myself entertained by the characters. Crier was difficult at first for me because she’s an android “playmate” essentially, meaning she doesn’t have much will of her own. That type of character is always a hard one for me to enjoy because I like my leads in fantasy to have energy and motive, but I will say Crier grew on me throughout the story. When she starts to realize she is defective and begins to understand human agency, there’s a wonderful shift and growth in her character that is VERY rewarding. Ayla on the other hand, has very one-dimensional goals (aka. revenge, revenge, and REVENGE) and while she is energetic and a go-getter, she takes a lot of time for development and I still didn’t feel like she grew enough for me to connect with.

The romance in this novel is adorable and cheesy. It’s definitely the kind of romance that steams from hate-to-love, and it’s not necessary the most well-developed at times, but I totally bought into it. It’s corny and charming, and I think that can be a great thing in a story that is a bit too serious and dark, which Crier’s War has in spades.

The writing through is solid, there’s definitely some beautiful passages, and I think the world building is very interesting throughout. I think Crier’s War succeeds in being a plot-heavy story, but not necessarily a character driven one. There’s definitely some fantastic character driven moments (Crier’s awakening being fantastically portrayed), but I don’t feel it’s entirely equal throughout the story.

I had fun reading Crier’s War and I am definitely intrigued to see where Varela goes with the sequel given how the book ended. I look forward to seeing Ayla and Crier grow some more, and I think there’s a lot of great ideas in this book. It was such an enjoyable read and easily something I can recommend to those who want a book that is just an easy, plot-driven fantasy novel.

ARC Review – The Night Country (The Hazel Wood #2) by Melissa Albert

Title: The Night Country (The Hazel Wood #2)

Author: Melissa Albert

Rating: ★★★★

Synopsis: In The Night Country, Alice Proserpine dives back into a menacing, mesmerizing world of dark fairy tales and hidden doors. Follow her and Ellery Finch as they learn The Hazel Wood was just the beginning, and that worlds die not with a whimper, but a bang.

With Finch’s help, Alice escaped the Hinterland and her reclusive grandmother’s dark legacy. Now she and the rest of the dregs of the fairy tale world have washed up in New York City, where Alice is trying to make a new, unmagical life. But something is stalking the Hinterland’s survivors―and she suspects their deaths may have a darker purpose. Meanwhile, in the winking out world of the Hinterland, Finch seeks his own adventure, and―if he can find it―a way back home…

Huge thank you to Raincoast for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

I have to say, I was surprised to see a sequel to The Hazel Wood. Perhaps it’s because I felt the first book wrapped up everything so well, so I was skeptical going into The Night Country. Turns out I was wrong about the need for a sequel — so very wrong in fact.

Melissa Albert knows how to weave a story. Whether you enjoyed The Hazel Wood or not, I think there is something to be said about writing that has the ability to make you feel discomfort. One element I loved from The Hazel Wood that is very present in this sequel, is how sinister the world feelings, the disjointedness of how everything is collapsing in on itself, and Albert’s ability to make the reader feel uncomfortable and lost.

Alice is still as frustrating as ever, but I think it’s why she is a good protagonist for stories that feature disjointed world-building. She questions things, she is curious, she is angry, and most of all, she has a will to change things for better or worse. The new characters in the book are fairly fascinating as well, and how they play into the world’s transformation feels very original and something out of video game.

There is so much I can’t talk about with this being a sequel, but I feel like if you enjoyed the first book, this one starts immediately after the first book, so rereading or quickly checking a summary is a good plan before hopping into this book. The twist and turns in this sequel are fantastic, the world building is top notch, and there is just so much mystery and intrigue to keep the reader pushing forward. I really enjoyed this sequel, and I’m happy it exists in the world.

Late to the Party ARC Review – Lintang and the Pirate Queen (Lintang #1) by Tamara Moss

Title: Lintang and the Pirate Queen (Lintang #1)

Author: Tamara Moss

Rating: ★★★★★

Synopsis: Lintang is an island girl who longs for daring and danger. When she meets the feared pirate Captain Shafira and her all-female crew, Lintang is determined to join them. Secrets within secrets, life-or-death battles with spectacular monsters, and hair’s breadth escapes keep readers turning the pages of a story populated by women of color who are fighters, adventurers, and leaders. 

Huge thank you to Raincoast for this ARC!

Sam’s Review: 

Lintang and the Pirate Queen is a wonderful fantasy romp starring a young and adventurous heroine who dreams of escaping her day-to-day life in hopes of sailing the high seas and battling mystical creatures. Sporting fantastic characters, a vivid world, and gripping storytelling, this middle grade fantasy is the complete package for even reader’s who may be reluctant.

Lintang is such a fantastic heroine who is flawed, but spunky. She has a lot of energy, she’s resourceful, and she’s a fun character to follow around because she has just the right amount of innocence. Bayani, her best friend, is kind and quiet and his storyline is truly something special. All the characters in this story have strong will, they make mistakes (and learn from them). The writing is rich in adventure and whimsy, that its the kind of fantasy where you are whisked away and the world is eye-catching and visible.

Moss weaves a wonderful tale of hope, adventure, friendship, and trust. I think readers will fall in love with the cast of characters, and I look forward to sharing this wonderful book with a variety of readers. I also hope that the sequels come to North America because I couldn’t put this book down!

ARC Review – The Deep & Dark Blue by Niki Smith

Title: The Deep & Dark Blue

Author: Niki Smith

Rating: ★★★★

Synopsis: After a terrible political coup usurps their noble house, Hawke and Grayson flee to stay alive and assume new identities, Hanna and Grayce. Desperation and chance lead them to the Communion of Blue, an order of magical women who spin the threads of reality to their will.

As the twins learn more about the Communion, and themselves, they begin to hatch a plan to avenge their family and retake their royal home.While Hawke wants to return to his old life, Grayce struggles to keep the threads of her new life from unraveling, and realizes she wants to stay in the one place that will allow her to finally live as a girl.

Huge thank you to Hachette Book Group Canada for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

The Deep & Dark Blue is a graphic novel that tells the story of Hawke and Grayson, who have to flee a politic coup. In order to survive, the two take on the identities of Hanna and Grayce. while seeking shelter, they come across the Communion of Blue, an order of magical women who have the ability to manipulate reality and bend its will. With the help of the Communion of Blue, the twins begin to hatch a plan to save their family’s name and and reclaim their royal heritage.

I loved this story. Hanna and Gracye are wonderful and well fleshed out. Their desire to protect their family home, while working through their personal identities, makes for fantastic storytelling. Given the coup that has destroyed their family and forced them apart, it’s easy to empathize with Hanna and Gracye. There is also a story about transition in The Deep & Dark Blue that is both simple, but effectively portrayed. I truly loved Gracye’s character so much.

While the ARC was in black and white, I am excited to see what the finished product looks like. I think those who love Faith Erin Hick’s stories will easily find The Deep & Dark Blue to be right up their alley. This is a fantastic story about family, identity, and what it means to survive in a time of oppression.