Tag Archives: japan

ARC Review – Wind/Pinball: Two Early Novels by Haruki Murakami

24013720Title:  Wind/Pinball: Two Early Novels

Author: Haruki Murakami

Rating:  ★★★★

Synopsis: The debut short novels–nearly thirty years out of print– by the internationally acclaimed writer, newly retranslated and in one English-language volume for the first time, with a new introduction by the author.

These first major works of fiction by Haruki Murakami center on two young men–an unnamed narrator and his friend and former roommate, the Rat. Powerful, at times surreal, stories of loneliness, obsession, and eroticism, these novellas bear all the hallmarks of Murakami’s later books, giving us a fascinating insight into a great writer’s beginnings, and are remarkable works of fiction in their own right. Here too is an exclusive essay by Murakami in which he explores and explains his decision to become a writer. Prequels to the much-beloved classics A Wild Sheep Chase and Dance Dance Dance, these early works are essential reading for Murakami completists and contemporary fiction lovers alike.

Huge thank you to Random House Canada for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

So I spent many, many years looking to find a translation for both of these novels. Believe it or not a translation did exist forHear the Wind Sing, but the price to get a physical copy of it was beyond absurd. So colour me thrilled when this collection was announced (and once again translated by an old professor of mine). Wind/Pinball is a bind up of Hear the Wind Sing andPinbal 1973, and are Murakami’s first two “novels” if you wish to call them that.

What I loved about this collection was that we get to see the beginnings of a young Haruki Murakami. We see the themes that are now considered staples in his works showing early life. Isolation, love, jazz, it’s all here in it’s rawest forms. Personally, I really enjoyed the visit in both these stories, especially because it gave me a lot of insight into Murakami as an early writer, and it shows the rougher areas in his writing where you can tell he was still new to the craft. It felt like such an enriching experience. The downside, however, to this is that while these were his first novels, they don’t actual feel like anything new. I could sense that some of his later works were influenced by these first two stories, particularly South of the Border, West of the Sun, which I’d argue is still a better novel than both of these.

However, I enjoyed and read both novels in one sitting. Murakami’s writing is still captivating, and it was interesting to see the origins of The Rat, who is a popular character in A Wild Sheep Chase. You get to see two very distinctive and different sides to this character when reading Wind/Pinball, and yet you know it’s the same person from all three stories. I adored both novels but for different reasons: in Hear the Wind Sing, I loved how the hero was a disc-jockey, yet he didn’t have the greatest social skills. Reading that particular story gave me a huge appreciation for why jazz and its culture is so prevalent in Murakami’s works.

Pinball 1973 was the more quirky of the two stories, as once again we have a jazz loving protagonist, with an interest in pinball, but can’t seem to get the ladies to like him. Again, we have all of Murakami’s signature themes, but in this story we start to see more of the quirky sense of humour that Murakami has. My favourite part was these two twins and the protagonist could never figure out how to identify them separately, and they play being identical twins up so hard on him. It’s gets so bad that they get sweat-shirts with different numbers on them, and when he asks if he can call them by number, they take off their shirts and switch them. I thought that was hilarious.

I think for hardcore Murakami fans, this is a must read in the sense that it’ll provide you with some historical insight into his early works, as well as his writing process. The introduction in this collection alone is worth reading for those curious about his habits, where he came from, and why he reuses the same themes throughout his stories. Both stories offer a lot of interesting moments, though similarly they don’t offer anything that feels new or that you haven’t seen from Murakami before. They’re worth the read, and then while your at it, go read A Wild Sheep Chase to simply see how the Rat’s story comes to end.

 

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Cultural Accuracy in YA

Lately there has been a big push for more diversity in YA. Non-white main characters, non-American (non-Western) settings, LGBQTI characters, and so on. With that comes the challenge of writing not only diversely, but accurately. Often non gay or non POC authors get flack for not writing their gay or POC characters stereotypical and cliche. And I’m glad that this stuff is being addressed. It’s important that diversity isn’t used as a gimmick.

I take issue with books set in Asia that are not accurate. I’ve run across a few ‘white girl goes to ::insertAsiancountryHERE::’ novels that have thrown me into a rage. It’s a topic that I feel very close to, and I’ve decided to write about it here. I polled twitter and facebook and people are interested, so here we go.

179542_10100696192142385_2114367399_nBefore we get too far I want to say that while I am addressing accuracy in books set in Asia, Japan specifically, I am not an expert on Japan and Asia. I do feel that I am qualified to speak about this topic though because I lived in Japan for seven years. I did one year of study abroad in Tokyo while living with two host families and then after graduation I worked in Japan for another six years. I lived in Tokyo, Saitama, and Ibaraki. I worked for three different English teaching companies. I did my taxes in Japanese. I went to the hospital in Japanese. I got married to a Japanese man and have an extended family still in Japan. I might not still be living in Japan, but I have life experience there (I almost died twice!) Oh, and I have a minor in East Asian Studies. So that’s as far as my “authority” goes.

Japan is a beautiful country, Japanese is a difficult language, and the culture is very different 268770_10100219200966525_3845584_nfrom Western culture. One of the biggest issues I have with some of the YA books set in Japan is that the MC usually acclimates way too quickly. She (so far I’ve only read one book with a male MC) picks up the language in no time and never suffers from culture shock. In Ink, by Amanda Sun, our MC, Katie, moves to Japan to live with her aunt after her mother’s death. Not only is Katie dealing with grieving, she’s suddenly dumped in a new country. And yet she does FINE. We’re lead to believe that the dialogues are all in Japanese (which just was so confusing because it’s all written in English, hence it is a translation of the Japanese being spoken) and there is no way that Katie has mastered Japanese that quickly. In the book she often comments on her poor Kanji skills, but then she’s seen writing emails to her friends in Japanese. And with little trouble. There are a few times when we see her struggling, but her language skills (while not shown in actual Japanese) are pretty flawless. From my own experiences learning Japanese in class and learning Japanese on the street are two different things. When I moved to Japan for study abroad I had studied Japanese for three years in college. When I got there I thought I was the shit and would be able to communicate no problem. Instead I had a horrible time. I struggled so much. I even gave up after awhile. I did have friends that flourished and became very good at Japanese in a short period of time, but even then they weren’t fluent quiet yet. So unless Katie had some amazing secret language genius that the author didn’t let us in on, that was just totally unbelievable to me.

I also take issue with the lack of culture shock most MCs face. In both Ink and Katie M. Stout’s Hello, I Love You! (which was set in South Korea, so I can’t comment much on the Korean culture in this one) the MCs seem to have no trouble leaving their troubled pasts behind and flourishing in these new, unfamiliar places. Katie almost seems to forget about her mother and the most “culture shock” I saw her have was when she couldn’t eat karage (a type of fried chicken using sesame oil) for lunch and had to eat PB&J. Later on this is used to show Katie’s “growth” as she leaves her American-ness behind to embrace her Japanese self or something. It really bothered me that she never had any true culture shock. And not ‘oh this is a weird thing in Japan’ (that is not real culture shock), but the debilitating anxiety that comes before having to go use the ATM or send a package at the post office or get your hair cut. The feeling that it’s probably safer to stay inside where you don’t have to face something in a foreign language. Culture shock that myself and many of my friends faced when first living in Japan. Hello, I Love You‘s MC, Grace,  never even had jet lag, let alone culture shock. This is such a real thing and should be explored! I know that it probably takes away from what the author wanted the story to be about (romance in a foreign land) but it’s just not accurate at all.

574635_10100599906679225_1114244541_nMy number on biggest rage inducing trope in these books is the ‘white girl can’t use chopsticks’ stereotype. But Molly!, you cry, I’m a white girl and I can’t use chopsticks! I’ve tried! Well guess what, you weren’t taught properly. And if you were taught properly, you could do it. It’s NOT hard. And it makes me so mad that people think it is. And it makes me RAGEFULL when this is used to show growth. It’s not growth. When you learn how to use a fork does that show that you’ve really made strides as a person and have really come to accept the land around you? No. (Guess what, Japanese people can use forks! And spoons! And knives!) Also, being judgmental about food. I get that in a lot of these books the MC doesn’t want to go to whatever country they’re going to. They didn’t choose, and I did. But they should still try. I don’t understand the judgement. I recently read Holly Smale’s Geek Girl: Model Misfit. This book takes place in Japan, and it’s probably one of the best YA books set in Japan that I’ve read to date. The MC wants to go to Japan, has some interest, but she’s there as a tourist. She’s not expected to act like someone who’s living there, trying to assimilate. And I loved how fun it was to see Japan the way I saw it when I first went there. And that first time EVERYTHING IS AWESOME feeling isn’t in either Ink or Hello, I Love You! You might think it shouldn’t be in either of those books because both of the MCs are in Japan and Korea following some heavy issues, but I do feel like they should have experience some of that initial I’M HERE euphoria. That’s NATURAL of traveling anywhere (and, also, a stage of real culture shock!). I loved Geek Girl’s wide eyed fun view of Japan. And I loved how freaking accurate all of it was! (some of the Japanese romanizations weren’t 100%, but other than that, so good). I also loved that there was no judging of the food (or anything really).

The best book I’ve read that was set in Asia has to be Listen,
22477286Slowly, by Thaniha Lai. I don’t know much about Vietnam, but this book is about a young girl who’s, I believe, 3rd generation Vietnamese. She has no connection to the country other than it’s where her parents and grandmother are from. She knows maybe five words of Vietnamese, and has no interest in her heritage. She then has to go spend the summer there with her grandmother and the MC suffers culture shock, acceptance, and immersion. She also reconnects with her grandmother and starts to accept and show interest in her heritage. Now, this book doesn’t have a white MC (she is very American/ Western tho), so maybe that’s part of it, but also I believe the author has real experience in Vietnam or with Vietnamese culture. And I feel that therein lies the problem with a lot of these books. While they are researched, they aren’t lived. When I find out that an author didn’t truly LIVE (not stay, not visit, LIVE) in the country they’re writing about (and they claim they did) I can see how it falls into stereotypes and inaccuracies. With Ink I felt like I was reading a manga. With Hello, I Love You I felt like I was reading a Kdrama. When your source material is already fiction it’s difficult to construct your own accurate fiction.

Anyways, these are just a few thoughts I have on this topic (I have more!) and in no way is this post intended to attack the books and authors mentioned. I believe that the authors tried their best, but at the same time could have done better to keep things more accurate. I am not critiquing the stories or the writing, only the inaccurate portrayals of what it’s like to be a foreigner (specifically a western female) living abroad in an Asian country.

295113_10100599907248085_553024258_nFeel free to leave me your thoughts in the comments and let’s have a dissuasion! Also, I’m interested in hearing about if you have any experience with books set in countries that you have experience in! For example, I’ve had a few British friends have trouble with Anna and the French Kiss! I’d love to know more about the inaccuracies that take place in books set in other countries as well!

ARC Review – Rain by Amanda Sun

18134013Title: Rain

Author: Amanda Sun

Rating: ★★★★ / ★★★

Synopsis:  American Katie Green has decided to stay in Japan. She’s started to build a life in the city of Shizuoka, and she can’t imagine leaving behind her friends, her aunt and especially Tomohiro, the guy she’s fallen in love with. But her return is not as simple as she thought. She’s flunking out of Japanese school and committing cultural faux pas wherever she goes. Tomohiro is also struggling—as a Kami, his connection to the ancient gods of Japan and his power to bring drawings to life have begun to spiral out of control.

When Tomo decides to stop drawing, the ink finds other ways to seep into his life—blackouts, threatening messages and the appearance of unexplained sketches. Unsure how to help Tomo, Katie turns to an unexpected source for help—Jun, her former friend and a Kami with an agenda of his own. But is Jun really the ally he claims to be? In order to save themselves, Katie and Tomohiro must unravel the truth about Tomo’s dark ancestry, as well as Katie’s, and confront one of the darkest gods in Japanese legend

Huge thank you to Harlequin Teen and Netgalley for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

Oh Amanda Sun, why are your books so fun? I don’t know what it is, but the Paper Gods has this brand of melodrama that just sucks me in every time. I don’t know if it’s the fact that I picture reading this as an anime or manga, but I every page I read I find myself visualize everything aspect of this story that just makes a lot of the elements feel natural.

I love that in this instalment we learn more about the ink and how it inhabits life. A lot of the paranormal elements just feel so naturally woven into the story and they are the most intriguing aspects. Further more, I love love love Kami, and even though I’ve studied Japanese literature and folklore for many years, I always enjoy seeing different interpretations or revisions because it’s interesting to also see what stays in tact and what is changed in order to tell the intended story. Overall, it’s fun, and it stays fun because the characters just make it so dramatic and kinda crazy.

I’m still not huge on the romance or love triangle aspects in this series, but I will admit that parts of this novel made me sad. Katie was so much more of an observer in this book as opposed to an active participant, yet we get two very sad stories from both Tomo and Jun and I was just so heartbroken for the two of them! Truthfully though, I think Sun has a great talent for writing male characters, especially the kind that are wounded but want redemption of some kind. Hopefully in the next book, both those boys will find the solace that they are clearly seeking. Oh and Shiori? She needs a big smack.

Rain was just a fun read overall, and even with it’s melodramatic aspects, it’s so easy to be an active participant in this world, and I loved the fusion of culture and language. There is such a vividness to the flow of language and I love how easy everything is to visualize, which I think is a feat in itself considering it’s not always easy to picture what you are reading. I’m definitely looking forward to the conclusion, but oddly I think I’m patience enough that I’m in no hurry to get there.

River’s Review:

This book was MUCH better than the first one. There were still a lot of things that made me roll my eyes (see all of my status updates) but THANK YOU FOR NOT USING GAIJIN!!!! Finally. It was only used 2-3 times in this book and it was used in the proper way. Finally. The whole name thing bothered me because it’s really not a thing for foreigners. In my seven years in Japan I have never had any issues with names.

Also, Ishikawa getting shot and then it being basically no big deal outside of the small group involved in the book is just unrealistic. Guns are illegal in Japan and if a random high school kid ended up in the hospital from a gun shot that would be HUGE. The lack of media frenzy around that was just weird. The lack of ANY frenzy was weird. I mean, earlier this month here in Japan a stupid pop star got attacked with a saw and that’s ALL anyone could talk about for WEEKS. I once heard a news story about a weirdo shooting girls with mayonnaise. A gunshot wound would big A BIG DEAL.

Katie was much better in this. Still can’t believe that she lost her mom a year ago and is just so okay with it. She was less stupid and less stalker-ish, but there were a few times when I just wanted to tell her to SHUT UP OMG. Shiori was super annoying but made some good points that highlighted some issues that I think are important to talk about. Jun was too melodramatic and his drama was so annoying. I feel bad for Ikeda and loved Tomo (dream sigh) as always.

Overall I felt like this was a lot more story and a lot less of Sun trying to prove that she has some authority over teaching us Japanese culture. The first book felt like LOOK AT ALL THIS STUFF I KNOW ABOUT JAPAN and this one had a LOT less of that.

Annnnnd finally, as with the first book, I don’t believe Katie’s Japanese ability AT ALL. There is no way that she’s as fluent (speaking wise) as she is. There’s no way she’s running around able to understand everyone, saying everything correctly, no problem, and then turning around and having so much trouble with reading and writing and then turning around and whipping out text messages and reading others no problem. Also, they’re all supposed to be speaking Japanese, but again there’s a bunch of Japanese words written in romanji thrown in and it just makes no sense. A lot of the words were also defined and explained in text this time (despite having a functioning glossary in this eArc, unlike the first one). I really wish that all of those random romanji were left out. It MIGHT make it a bit more believable (or at least make me think less about what language they’re speaking) that they’re speaking Japanese all of the time.

ANYWAY. If you liked the first book, then you’ll like this. And sorry not sorry for being so nit-picky, but I feel that if we’re going to go the whole #weneeddiversebooks route then the books with all the diversity in them should at least be accurate.

River’s April Wrap-up

jtmayHow, HOW is it May???? Time is going by so fast, I can’t even. Sooooooo anyway, in April a lot of things happened! What you ask??? Well…

Books

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I read fifteen books. Eleven ARCs and four of my own books. YES! I didn’t read ONLY ARCs for once! Also my lovely friend Melissa Giorgio’s book The Soul Healer came out and that was really exciting! Best book of April was a tie between After the End by Amy Plum and Audrey, WAIT! by Robin Benway.

Music

audrey

Reading Audrey, WAIT! brought back ALLLLLLL the music feels from my youth (along with maybe my birthday, sobs) and I started to listen to a lot of the music that I listened to when I was in college. So this past month I’ve been rocking out to bands like Death Cab for Cutie, Panic at the Disco, Fall Out Boy, Taking Back Sunday, and all that indie-emo-rock that was ‘so underground it’s cool’ back in the early 2000’s. MAN, I miss being in my early twenties, going to shows, moshing, all that fun stuff.

TV

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I’m SUPER behind on my TV watching thanks to all of the reading I’ve been doing (and running around being busy with other things) but husband and I have been SUPER into S.H.I.E.L.D since it suddenly got REALLY FREAKING GOOD. I’ve also been watching Game of Thrones but I tend not talk about that because I can’t keep up with the freaking book fans who want to crucify me for not reading the books. Other than that I haven’t started anything new and wont until I catch up with Arrow, The Originals and The Vampire Diaries.

General life stuff

tokyoI went to Tokyo three times last week and I’m going back next week. So crazy… but it will probably be my last time to do anything in Tokyo. I know I haven’t said much on here, but husband and I are moving to the USA in a few months (I will make a big post about that soon-ish, we’re still working on the details and I feel crazy saying anything until I know more spesifics)

Anyways, I took this photo from the fourteenth floor of the Shibuya West Mark City tower. Husband and I were stopping by the bank before heading to his alma mater to visit his college professors. It was really fun, but A LOT of train riding (about 6 hours total for the day!!!). It was really fun to see his school again and to speak with his professors. We also went out for THE MOST delicious sushi I’ve ever had.

A few days before that I’d also spent a couple of days in Tokyo with husband’s family, and I went to the eye doctor. My eyes are super stable right now and I said goodbye to my eye doctor (it was actually kinda bittersweet! She’s been taking care of me for the past SEVEN YEARS) and got some documents to give to my new eye doctor in the USA. I just… have to hold out until I get there (and get health insurance… come on eyes, you can do it!) and hope that my eyes remain stable.

And next week is Golden Week (which is just a series of national holidays that a lot of people get off from work) so husband and I are going to spend some MORE time in Tokyo to say goodbye to friends, visit his family and… say goodbye to Tokyo itself.

 

 

River’s March Wrap-up

Best book in March

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Loooooooooved Salvage! And as one of the books I was most looking forward to in 2014 I am SO happy that I did! Ah, check this one out guys, it’s amazing!

Despite traveling at the beginning of the month, and feeling like I was NEVER EVER going to finish ANYTHING I managed to read TWELVE BOOKS! I read ten ARCs and two of my own books. I’m sadly in the middle of two books right now so I wont have a nice round ‘finished’ amount of March, but I should at least get them finished tomorrow and technically it will still be March somewhere… hahaha.

Music

Guys. guys. GUYS. I cannot believe it CANNOT believe it that Taking Back Sunday came out with a new CD and IT IS GOOD. I was so scared that it would suck. It’s been forever for them and I am a HUGE fan and went to their shows ~back in the day~ and I listen to them when I’m depressed because I just feel so damn powerful for some reason when I do. TBS has gotten me through two of THE MOST difficult times in my life and I wouldn’t be who I am right now without this band. So when this song came out and I LIKED IT I was so excited. Then ‘Stood a Chance’ came out and while I like the song the video made me cringe so I got a bit worried and then the CD dropped and I listened to it like twice and wasn’t wowed or anything so. But then I put it on repeat while I was tromping through Tokyo on a rainy day a few weeks ago and THAT. WAS. IT. I was hooked and have been hooked and cannot stop listening to this CD. There’s such a sense of nostalgia that I feel like I’m 20 years old again and then it feels fresh enough that I can enjoy finding new things to love and just. wow. Words. I don’t have them.

 

Health

Before I go into this I want to start by saying that I don’t think I’m fat. In fact, I know I’m not. I’m the perfect weight for my height and body type. I’ve been overly thin, even underweight, my entire life. I am NOT saying that I am fat. Thus stated… I AM out of shape. Painfully so. The past year I was super busy with personal things. STRESSFUL things. I didn’t eat well, I didn’t exercise, didn’t sleep well and overall just wasn’t very healthy. Also, when I’m stressed, I don’t eat. SO now that I’m A LOT less stressed I’m eating normally. Maybe even more than normal. And I have gained some weight. I’m also still incredibly out of shape. So I’m trying to do something about that. I’m trying to make healthier, smarter (and cheaper) choices.

So I’ve started eating less crap and I’m working on improving my diet. I USED to just eat a piece of toast in the morning. Now I’m eating a bowl of oatmeal (with vanilla sugar) for breakfast. I used to go to the grocery store and buy a prepared lunch (Japanese obento) which not only costs over $5, but it’s also not that healthy. So I’ve started buying fruit and lunch meat and soups and I’m eating like an after school special but whatever. Ham and tomato sandwich. Mixed fruit. Tomato soup. Tasty, healthy and much cheaper. Plus this way I can eat BEFORE going to the grocery store, stressing myself out less and BUYING less.

For dinner since I usually eat at work I have to buy something from the grocery store (or convenience store). I know I could make my own food, but that is just too much effort (did I mention that I’m lazy?) But I’m trying to go for healthier items. No more chips, no more cookies, no more snacks. I’m eating prepared noodle meals, salads, and fruit-jelly cups. I’m spending so much less and WASTING so much less too. I always end up buying more than I can eat and since most of it expires at the end of the day (or will go bad in my work cubby if I choose to save it for later) so I just toss it. wtf self.

So that’s been something I’ve been working on since the beginning of the month, and I must say, I’m feeling a lot better. I’m still super out of shape, but my energy levels are much better, I’m sleeping a bit better, and I’m really proud of myself for sticking with it.

 

TV

Nothing too exciting this month. I started Starcrossed and it’s kinda lame so far. I’m almost scared that I’m getting too old for CW shows. GASP. I’m going to give it a shot though, I thought TVD was super lame at the start, but I came to love it. I also gave The 100 a shot and it was pretty good… I have NOT read the book and probably wont because it has like a million perspectives and that’s totally not my thing. I’m going to give that a few more episodes before deciding if it’s going to be something I keep up with. Other than that I’ve been loving The Originals and Arrow. Still not sure about TVD this season, which makes me sob.

 

New Blog Feature

Did you guys see my new feature? It’s called Before & AfterThe way it works is that at the beginning of every month I’m going to choose one book that I am DYING to read and one that I am SCARED to read. I’m going to write down why I can’t wait/ am afraid to read the books. This is the BEFORE. Then I’ll read them! And at the end of the month I’m going to update with the AFTER: how I felt about them, if they lived up to my expectations/disappointed me/blew my mind etc. I’ve already posted my BEFORE for March, so make sure to check out my AFTER post (following this one). And feel free to join me!

Secret news

IMG_4763

Have a picture for now… real announcement to come…

Snow Day!!!

IMG_4747Snow Mamegoma!

It snowed today! Which I know, for most of you reading, that this is NOT a big deal (especially if you are in the USA, which is like 95% covered with snow) and DEFINITELY nothing new for my better half (Sam is from Canada if y’all don’t remember) but I haven’t seen this much snow since 2009. It DOES snow in Japan (in the northern areas) but the main island doesn’t see that much snow. Tokyo usually gets hit with snow in late February, but for the most part the East, West and Southern areas are just cold, snowless places in the winter.

IMG_4757 IMG_4739IMG_4740Last night’s weather forecast called for snow and all of my students started to cancel because they don’t have ~snow tires~ (which yes, I know if the area isn’t used to snow that people WILL freak out about having to drive in it and that it IS unsafe, but the whole OMG NEED SNOW TIRES FOR TWO INCHES OF SNOW thing cracked me up) and my manager was worried about if the train would stop/ be delayed, so she gave me the day off! Yay for having a Saturday off! So Husband and I went out for lunch, took photos and built a snow Mamegoma!

IMG_4742 IMG_4745The wind is actually blowing so hard it’s making baby snowdrifts! Awww, it’s like back home (If y’all don’t remember, I’m from the lakeshore area in Michigan where they currently have snowdrifts taller than human beings).

Also, if you’re wondering why we’re wearing surgical face masks… it’s a thing that people in Japan do. Most people believe that the masks will help keep you from catching a cold or that if you have a cold you should wear one to keep your germs to yourself. They’re also INCREDIBLY good at keeping your face warm, so Husband and I always wear them when we go outside.

IMG_4750 IMG_4753A few years ago Husband and I went on a trip to one of the more snowy areas of Japan and we built a snow Mamegoma. We’ve always talked about having the chance to make another one and today was finally the day! We built this little guy on our front walkway. I hope our neighbors think he’s cute!!!

18820442Snow day reading!

And now I’m going to curl up with a cup of tea and read this for the rest of this cold, snowy day! Mannnnn, I was having so much trouble getting into anything this past week (three DNFs in a row!) so I decided to try one of my most anticipated 2014 books and mmmmmm this is GOOD!

Happy snow day!