Tag Archives: Sam

ARC Review – Somewhere Only We Know by Maurene Goo

Title: Somewhere Only We Know

Author: Maurene Goo

Rating: ★★★★

Synopsis: 10 00 p.m.: Lucky is the biggest K-pop star on the scene, and she’s just performed her hit song “Heartbeat” in Hong Kong to thousands of adoring fans. She’s about to debut on The Tonight Show in America, hopefully a breakout performance for her career. But right now? She’s in her fancy hotel, trying to fall asleep but dying for a hamburger.

11 00 p.m.: Jack is sneaking into a fancy hotel, on assignment for his tabloid job that he keeps secret from his parents. On his way out of the hotel, he runs into a girl wearing slippers, a girl who is single-mindedly determined to find a hamburger. She looks kind of familiar. She’s very cute. He’s maybe curious.

12:00 a.m.: Nothing will ever be the same.

Huge thank you to Raincoast for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

I have clearly been in a fluffy romance mood, and Maurene Goo knows how to fit that bill for me. I have enjoyed all of her books and I seem to read them at the right periods of my life. Somewhere Only We Know is about K-Pop, love, and the courage to be who you wanna be. I was easily shipping Lucky and Jack while reading this.

I think what I love about Maurene Goo’s books is that her characters are always a ton of fun and they feel like real people. There always feels like there’s a magic element to her stories, and this one takes place mostly through the course of a day. It’s weird for me because I generally despite insta-love, but this one I think worked for me given the circumstances of how the two characters meet each other.

I loved Lucky, and I felt for her whenever she talked about her homesickness or her need to have her family’s love and support. It’s very clear throughout the story how much she values their opinions. I also loved Jack despite a few things he does in the story that made me cranky. He’s got a good energy and sense of humour, so I see how this all works together.

Ultimately, this is one of those stories I think you need to be in the right headspace for. It’s cute, the drama is a bit over the top, but the book has a ton of heart in it. Maurene Goo knows how to capture her readers into a fun romance and make them feel the same intensity her characters are experiencing and it’s why I keep reading her books. Somewhere Only We Know is a wonderful book about facing imperfection and embracing the kind of person you want to become.

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ARC Review -There’s Something About Sweetie by Sandhya Menon

Title: There’s Something About Sweetie

Author: Sandhya Menon

Rating: ★★★★★

Synopsis: Ashish Patel didn’t know love could be so…sucky. After being dumped by his ex-girlfriend, his mojo goes AWOL. Even worse, his parents are annoyingly, smugly confident they could find him a better match. So, in a moment of weakness, Ash challenges them to set him up.

The Patels insist that Ashish date an Indian-American girl—under contract. Per subclause 1(a), he’ll be taking his date on “fun” excursions like visiting the Hindu temple and his eccentric Gita Auntie. Kill him now. How is this ever going to work?

Sweetie Nair is many things: a formidable track athlete who can outrun most people in California, a loyal friend, a shower-singing champion. Oh, and she’s also fat. To Sweetie’s traditional parents, this last detail is the kiss of death.

Sweetie loves her parents, but she’s so tired of being told she’s lacking because she’s fat. She decides it’s time to kick off the Sassy Sweetie Project, where she’ll show the world (and herself) what she’s really made of.

Ashish and Sweetie both have something to prove. But with each date they realize there’s an unexpected magic growing between them. Can they find their true selves without losing each other?

Huge thank you to Simon & Schuster Canada for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

I swear, Sandhya Menon writes some of the best rom-coms I have ever had the pleasure of reading about. Not only does she create these wonderfully fleshed out characters, but her storylines have this addictive “just one more chapter” quality to them. I adored When Dimple Met Rishi the year it came out, so colour me happy when Ash, one of my favourite characters from that story, gets his own romance.

Ash and Sweetie are undeniably charming. Both characters have such unique personalities, yet you’re rooting from them to be together the whole damn story because all the nay-sayers who say they don’t fit are HECKIN’ WRONG. I will even argue that I loved Sweetie far more than I did Dimple, if only because Sweetie’s level of conviction and lack of apology for who she is, it is completely refreshing in a YA heroine. She has so much passion and I think how she discusses the word “fat” is it’s own wonderful revelation as well. Even just her storyline with her family, you get the sense that Sweetie truly loves her folks no matter what they even say to her.

Then there is my beloved Ash, who is just so darling and funny. It was nice to see more somber and thoughtful moments with him, given how high energy he was in When Dimple Met Rishi, and I like the way in which Menon handles his past relationships and how he is the sad boy trying to figure out what is wrong with him! Ash is swoony in a way that Rishi wasn’t for me, and it’s funny given I generally don’t find myself falling for the athletes in any contemporary story. Ash’s family, however? My goodness they are hilarious and his dad killed me.

In all fairness, read There’s Something About Sweetie. It has so much laughter with equal parts heart, and in a world where news spreads and things feel hopeless, it’s wonderful to be reminded of stories that evoke so much kindness and humour. If you want a fun little rom-com that doesn’t ask much of it’s read, this book is 100% for you.

Fave of the Month – April

April has come and gone, but I did read a lot of fantastic books during the month. I feel like my mojo is coming back with a vengeance, which makes me pretty happy given April was a huge month of change for me. I start a new full-time library gig on Monday, I’ve made better choices regarding what goals I want to achieve in my life — lots of positives. I also cry because April is also the month where the most money has to get spent because yay taxes and car insurance!

Anywho, let’s see the favourite book of the month.

Shout
by Laurie Halse Anderson (Published: March 12th 2019 by Viking Books)

This is an auto-biographical look at Laurie Halse Anderson’s childhood and a look back at when she was sexually assaulted as a child. This book, written in verse, is a haunting and chilling experience where Anderson pulls no punches and opens up about what it means to have had been raped and how she still keeps going and survives. I read this book in a few hours and I appreciate how uncomfortable at times it made me feel, but also the moments it instilled hope in me as well. There’s some amazing lessons in this book and it’s worth checking out.

ARC Review – Hurricane Season by Nicole Melleby

Title: Hurricane Season

Author: Nicole Melleby

Rating: ★★★★

Synopsis: Fig, a sixth grader, wants more than anything to see the world as her father does. The once-renowned pianist, who hasn’t composed a song in years and has unpredictable good and bad days, is something of a mystery to Fig. Though she’s a science and math nerd, she tries taking an art class just to be closer to him, to experience life the way an artist does. But then Fig’s dad shows up at school, disoriented and desperately searching for Fig. Not only has the class not brought Fig closer to understanding him, it has brought social services to their door.

Diving into books about Van Gogh to understand the madness of artists, calling on her best friend for advice, and turning to a new neighbor for support, Fig continues to try everything she can think of to understand her father, to save him from himself, and to find space in her life to discover who she is even as the walls are falling down around her.

Huge thank you to Thomas Allen & Sons for this ARC!

Sam’s Review:

Hurricane Season was a book I grabbed on a whim while I was at the OLA Super Conference early this year. It totally sounded like the kind of middle grade read I would love: a young girl trying to figure herself and her family out, while also learning to deal with large scale change. Fig is a sixth grader who at her tender age, is forced to become a caretaker to her father, a famous pianist, who has had a mental break down. In order to understand her father’s breakdown, Fig enlists in the help of her local library and begins to research Vincent Van Gogh, one of the world’s most well-known painter’s, but is equally known for his decent into madness.

This is a beautiful debut story, and Fig is such a kind, slow, quiet protagonist, making her very different from a lot of the characters you encounter in popular middle grade. She is placed in an uncomfortable position for a younger child, and yet she is determined to both support her father and understand his condition. This is not a fast paced story by any stretch of the imagination, it’s very quiet and thoughtful. Fig also has so much so support in this story, even if most of it comes from unlikely sources such as Hannah, who works at her local library.

I think what I love the most about Hurricane Season is that it’s a book all about taking risks, and how even if they don’t pay off or pay off unexpectedly, they are still worth attempting. There’s a positive message throughout this story that children can find and muster amazing and profound strength when they need to, and it’s very apparent in this story as Fig does this repeatedly, each time more difficult, but she in turn grows stronger for it.

Hurricane Season is beautiful and quiet, and it’s a book that offers so much to its reader, while being somewhat small in size. I highly recommend this book if you love tougher middle grade stories that offer opportunities to reflect on what it means to be a caretaker and how one’s life can easily be transformed in the blink of an eye.

The Scott Challenge – March & April Selections

Welcome back to the “Scott Challenge” where my husband is challenging me to read some of his favourite books and I provide some commentary. The two books this month couldn’t be more radically different, as one is a science fiction collection from 1997, the other a sweet fantasy story about immigration. Let’s dive in, shall we?

March Pick:

The Callahan Chronicals
(Callahan’s #1-3)
by Spider Robinson (Published: Published October 15th 1997 by Tor)

I have a love-hate relationship with Spider Robinson’s writing. Often I love his characters, but the writing is too dry for me, lacking any sort of oomph. That is exactly the problem with The Callahan Chronicles, on top of it being a short story collection at as well. I do love books that involve space bars and weird patrons, and my favourite story in the book was one full of puzzles, which then Robinson at the end had to write a lengthy author’s note about how people were sending him solutions to this one puzzle, but he himself for the answer! I weirdly want to play the Callhan video game that was made in 1997, and I still might. Just wish I loved this more. 2.5/5 Stars.

April Pick:

The Golem and the Jinni
(The Golem and the Jinni #1)
by Helene Wecker (Published April 23rd 2013 by Harper)

The Golem and the Jinni was a book I heard a lot about when it released and one admittedly I just never got around to when it released. This beautiful fantasy novel is one I devoured on my weekend in Thunder Bay, because both the Golem and the Jinni were loveable characters just trying to blend into the world around them. This is a wonderful and different take on the immigration story, and even if you don’t like fantasy, this is still a book I’d recommend people give a whirl. It’s sweet, touching, heartbreaking, and more hopeful than one would image. 4/5 Stars.

Middle Grade March Wrap Up – Part 2

On Monday, I shared with you all three of the five books  I read during Middle Grade March. If you haven’t seen that post, consider checking it out. Let’s see what the last two reads ended up being for me, shall we?

No Fixed Address
by Susin Nielsen

If you are a Canadian, than Susin Nielsen is likely a household name you know, whether its from her DeGrassi writing days, or her large contribution to middle grade or young adult fiction in Canada. I’ve now read every single one of her middle grade books and I’m never disappointed. I think No Fixed Address might be my favourite book from her. It’s about Felix and his mother who are homeless, and they are trying to do everything that they can to survive in B.C. Felix has a love of trivia and wants to go onto a kids trivia show in hopes of winning money so he and his money can pay off the debts they owe others and start fresh. Oh my god, I ugly cried through this one. It’s sweet, but oh so sad, but also very hopeful. I yelled at the ending. Repeatedly, actually. Susin Nielsen knows how to punch her reader in the feelings and this book was no exception. 5/5 Stars

Nothing but Trouble
by Jacqueline Davies

This book started out a bit slow for me, but as I read on, I laughed quite a bit. Lena and Maggie are clever and cheeky! This book is about Latin, pranking, and what it means to grow up and create friendships. The writing in this book has such a great energy to it, and I would definitely recommend it as a great middle grade read for those who wants a more of a quirky and silly reading experience. 3.5/5 Stars

Thanks for reading! I hope next Middle Grade March sees me some more fantastic middle grade books to read and recommend.

Middle Grade March Wrap-up – Part 1

Over the month of March, I decided to try and read a lot of middle grade. It was inspired by a lot of Booktubers who were doing similar, but also by the first book I finished in the month, All The Ways Home by Elise Chapman (which I keep hinting at and there will be a review closer to its release). Split into two posts, I thought it would be fun to share with you all the middle grade reads I checked out and some quick thoughts. I ended up reading six books, but will only be discussing five between the two posts.

The War I Finally Won
(The War That Saved My Life #2)
by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

I ADORED the first book in this series, but if I am being honest, I don’t feel like Ada’s story necessarily needed a continuation. This sequel has Ada and her brother Jamie with a legal guardian while World War II rages on. This is a hard one to talk about if you’ve never read the first book (which I highly recommend you do), but this one was a surpisingly slow sequel where I feel like it took its sweet time to get to the story it truly wanted to tell. I gave the first book a five star when I read it, but this one wasn’t the same spark for me. 3.5/5 Stars

The Golden Door
(The Three Doors Trilogy #1)
by Emily Rodda

I wanted to love this book so badly and I had a hard time with it. It’s likely more me than the book because I’ve been in such a weird fantasy slump and just not picking up fantasy books that spark joy in me. This one is such an old school sword, sorcery and dragon story for a middle grade audience and its fabulous in that regard for making that old school genre accessible. I thought the plot was very D&D and the characters just didn’t excite me. However, having since read it, I have recommended it a lot at work, especially for reluctant male readers! But yeah, this sadly wasn’t a hit for me. 2.5/5 Stars

To Night Owl from Dogfish
by Holly Goldberg Sloan &  Meg Wolitzer

A friend of mine described To Night Owl from Dogfish as “The Gap Parent Trap” and it 100% is. This addictive little book about two girls going away to a sleepover camp while trying to keep their dads in a relationship so that they get to become sisters is both funny, heartbreaking, and just charming all around. Avery and Bett will make you grin from ear to ear that’s how wonderful this story was. I think about it a lot and how much fun I had reading it, or how much I thought Bett’s grandmother was just the absolute best grandmother in a book ever. This sweet contemporary book knocked my socks off and I hope more folks check it out. 5/5 Stars

That’s it for part one! I hope you stay tuned because on Friday, I’ll share the other two wonderful reads I checked out for Middle Grade March!