Summer Contemporary Fling – 99 Days by Katie Cotugno

22836575Title: 99 Days

Author: Katie Cotugno

Rating:  ★★ / ★★ 1/2

Synopsis: Day 1: Julia Donnelly eggs my house my first night back in Star Lake, and that’s how I know everyone still remembers everything—how I destroyed my relationship with Patrick the night everything happened with his brother, Gabe. How I wrecked their whole family. Now I’m serving out my summer like a jail sentence: Just ninety-nine days till I can leave for college, and be done.

Day 4: A nasty note on my windshield makes it clear Julia isn’t finished. I’m expecting a fight when someone taps me on the shoulder, but it’s just Gabe, home from college and actually happy to see me. “For what it’s worth, Molly Barlow,” he says, “I’m really glad you’re back.”

Day 12: Gabe got me to come to this party, and I’m actually having fun. I think he’s about to kiss me—and that’s when I see Patrick. My Patrick, who’s supposed to be clear across the country. My Patrick, who’s never going to forgive me.

Huge thank you to Balzer + Bray and Edelweiss for this ARC!

River’s Review:

I… did not like this book. I found it incredibly frustrating and almost put it down a couple of times. I did like how it tackled double standards though, and for that I gave it two stars.

Molly Barlow is a selfish girl who keeps making the same mistakes over and over again. I HATED how every time she would do something that she KNEW was wrong she’d always brush it off as ‘I couldn’t help myself’ or ‘I couldn’t stop myself’. Uh, yes, you can. Nobody was FORCING you, EVER.

This book is about a girl who broke her boyfriend’s heart by sleeping with his brother. Molly was dating Patrick forEVER, but when they broke up (the DAY they broke up, wtf) she slept with his older brother. And then kept it a secret for a year until Molly’s mother (who’s a best selling novelist) wrote a book using Molly’s secret (wtf at her mom!) and then did an interview for People Magazine (again WTF!!! I’d be SO PISSED if that was my mom). Everyone in town found out about it and Molly ran away to boarding school. When she comes back for the summer she’s ostracized and slut shamed for what she did.

And that’s where I got super annoyed. I don’t understand how sleeping with Gabe, the older brother, ONCE = being a dirty whore. I could have understood that reaction a bit more (not agreed with, but understood) if she’d been sleeping with him for THE ENTIRE YEAR while still dating Patrick, but it was ONE time and they were BROKEN UP. So yes, I can see how the family would be hurt (Molly has been very close with the two brothers and their sister), and the brother’s pissed off, but I don’t know why the entire fucking TOWN decided that she was a dirty slut.

I also didn’t care for any of the characters. Tess and Imogen were really good friends and I felt so bad for them both when Molly kept treating them like crap and in the end really hurt Tess. I was a bit upset with Imogen at first when Molly came back to town, but when we find out what kind of stuff Imogen had been dealing with and how Molly had just dropped her, then I felt bad for her.

I really disliked Patrick and Gabe. They were both douhebags and while I did like that Gabe was willing to take a chance and befriend Molly at the beginning of the summer, and how he kept trying to include her, I didn’t really care for either brother and in the end when we find out more about why they both were going after her, well, that was just really shitty of them both. And ugh, Patrick pissed me off so much. And as much as everyone wants to point at Molly for being a cheater, she technically wasn’t until much later in the book. And she wasn’t the only one.

Like I said though, I did applaud this book for challenging the double standard. So often the female in the relationship is condemned and shunned for cheating and the male’s involvement is shrugged off as ‘well, men!’. Gabe often pointed out that it took the two of them to do what they’d done, and same goes for Patrick later on in the book. I did cheer for Molly when she addressed the issue, but it was hard to cheer for her beyond much else.

Overall I just didn’t connect with anyone in this book, and while I usually enjoy messy stories where ugly pretty people get their just deserts, I never really found anyone who I felt got what they deserved, and I hated not having anyone to cheer for at all in this entire book.

Sam’s Review:

While a lot of the reviews say this book will either be a love or hate affair, I found myself somewhat indifferent. I adored Cotugno’s debut, How to Love, so of course 99 Days shot up to be an anticipated read. I don’t think this book is bad, but it’s quite middling and somewhat problematic.

I really didn’t enjoy how Molly being a cheater automatically made her “slut” in the eyes of everyone in the community. It seemed a little ridiculous at times, and I mean I can’t blame her feeling like a “slut” if that’s how people are portraying her, but it gets to be a little suffocating at times. I had a hard time with Molly, because sometimes I found I was able to empathize with her, especially when she was trying to make her life more positive, but she repeatedly makes the same mistake over and over again, and it takes her so long to learn from those mistakes, and that can be frustrating for a reader who wants to cheer her on.

Molly is selfish, and her lack of regret is problematic for me. Especially in how she hurts both Tess and Imogen, and yet her character and personality — it felt very real to me in the way that Cotugno knows how to flesh out her characters. Some people, like Molly, just don’t get it, and I think there are parts of that novel where Cotugno is trying to portray this idea that not everyone figures stuff out or sometimes even tries. They aren’t good people, but when I think of where Molly comes from, having her dirty laundry aired in her mother’s best-selling novel, I sort of see why she behaves like she’s stuck.

Frankly, I hate both the male love interests, which shouldn’t be surprising because I hated the one in How to Love. But again, for me, I hate Gabe and Patrick because it comes from the fact that they feel real, like real people I wouldn’t like even in real life. Gabe is just full of himself and a tool, while Patrick is a firecracker who just can’t see beyond himself. And that’s just it, these characters are selfish, mean, but they are people you may have encountered in your lives. I applaud Cotugno’s writing because I’ve always enjoyed the fact that her characters can be appalling and problematic, but they are real people who just happen to be unlike-able.

And here’s the thing, yes cheating is a taboo subject, but it does happen, and it shouldn’t be the end of someone’s world because they’ve done it. I think what frustrates me at times is this idea that when someone is a cheater, they are always a cheater, and I don’t think that’s entirely true. People make mistakes, they are human, it’s what you learn from the experience. It may take Molly the entire story to learn from her mistakes and even fix some of her relationships, but she’s still a young person learning to be someone. It’s why even when I was angry and frustrated with her, I could still empathize. I’ve met people like her in my life, and yes they are imperfect — but aren’t we all?

At the end of the day, 99 Days is a frustrating read, but I appreciate the kinds of lessons that Cotugno was trying to infuse into the story about some people never getting it. The ending works so perfectly because Molly is called out once more, and yet she knows she’s leaving for college and she gets that chance to potentially have a fresh start. Sometimes you have to let people learn the hard way, which is what I got from this novel. I still would recommend How to Love over this novel any day, but I admit I did want more from 99 Days and I just didn’t get it in the end.

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